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5 Pounds 1964, Zambia

in Krause book Number: 3a
Years of issue: 16.11.1964
Edition: 2 969 876
Signatures: Governor: Mr. R.C.Hallet (in office from 1964 till 1967)
Serie: 16 November 1964 Issue
Specimen of: 1964
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 159 x 88
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

5 Pounds 1964

Description

Watermark:

watermark

The blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus).

Avers:

5 Pounds 1964

Connochaetes taurinusOn right side is the blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus).

The blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), also called the common wildebeest, white-bearded wildebeest or brindled gnu, is a large antelope and one of the two species of wildebeest. It is placed in the genus Connochaetes and family Bovidae and has a close taxonomic relationship with the black wildebeest. The blue wildebeest is known to have five subspecies. This broad-shouldered antelope has a muscular, front-heavy appearance, with a distinctive robust muzzle. Young blue wildebeest are born tawny brown, and begin to take on their adult colouration at the age of two months. The adults' hues range from a deep slate or bluish gray to light gray or even grayish-brown. Both sexes possess a pair of large curved horns.

The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on the short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd. Blue wildebeest are found in short grass plains bordering bush-covered acacia savannas in southern and eastern Africa, thriving in areas that are neither too wet nor too arid. Each year, some East African populations of blue wildebeest take part in a long-distance migration, seemingly timed to coincide with local patterns of rainfall and grass growth.

The blue wildebeest is native to Angola, Botswana, Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Today it is extinct in Malawi, but has been successfully reintroduced in Namibia. The southern limit of the blue wildebeest range is the Orange River, while the western limit is bounded by Lake Victoria and Mt Kenya. The blue wildebeest is widespread and is being introduced into private game farms, reserves and conservancies. For this reason, the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) rates the blue wildebeest as being of Least Concern. The population has been estimated to be around one and a half million and the population trend is stable.

coat Zambia

The Coat of arms of Zambia is top, centered.

The coat of arms of Zambia was adopted on 24 October 1964 when the Republic of Zambia reached its independence. This coat of arms is adapted from the arms of the Colony of Northern Rhodesia which dates to 1927.

The eagle of liberty African Fish Eagle represents the conquest of freedom and nation's hope for the future.

The pick and hoe represent the country's economic backbone: agriculture and mining, as well as the characteristics that have influenced Zambia's evolution and nature. The shield is a representation of Victoria Falls with white water cascading over black rock. The Victoria Falls represents the Zambezi river, from which Zambia takes its name. The coat of arms also has emblems of Zambia's natural resources: minerals and mining, agriculture and wildlife.

Haliaeetus vocifer

The African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) or the African Sea Eagle is a large species of eagle that is found throughout sub-Saharan Africa wherever large bodies of open water occur that have an abundant food supply. It is the national bird of Zimbabwe, Zambia and South Sudan.

Below, in the center, is a circular pattern, which have not been able to identify. It looks like a shield, but I am still looking for confirmation.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words centered.

Revers:

5 Pounds 1964

Victoria fallsVictoria Falls - the view from Zambia.

Victoria Falls, or Mosi-oa-Tunya (Tokaleya Tonga: the Smoke that Thunders), is a waterfall in southern Africa on the Zambezi River at the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe (Rhodesia).

David Livingstone, the Scottish missionary and explorer, is believed to have been the first European to view Victoria Falls on 16 November 1855 from what is now known as Livingstone Island, one of two land masses in the middle of the river, immediately upstream from the falls on the Zambian side. Livingstone named his discovery in honour of Queen Victoria, but the indigenous name "Mosi-oa-Tunya" - "the smoke that thunders" - continues in common usage as well. The nearby national park in Zambia, for example, is named "Mosi-oa-Tunya", whereas the national park and town on the Zimbabwean shore are both named Victoria Falls. The World Heritage List officially recognizes both names.

Victoria - the only waterfall in the world, having more than 100 meters high and more than a kilometer wide.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words lower, centered.

Comments:

The pound was the currency in Zambia from independence in 1964 until decimalization on January 16, 1968. It was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence.

The Zambian pound replaced the Rhodesia and Nyasaland pound at par. It was pegged to the British pound at par and was replaced by the kwacha at a rate of 2 kwacha = 1 pound or 1 kwacha = 10 shillings.

In 1964, the Bank of Zambia introduced notes in denominations of 10 shillings, 1 and 5 pounds.