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1 Dollar 1982, Bermuda

in Krause book Number: 28b
Years of issue: 02.01.1982
Edition: 1 000 000
Signatures: Chairman: Mr. Frederick W. Yearwood, Managing Director: Mr.Merlyn Trued
Serie: No Serie
Specimen of: 01.07.1975
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 140 х 70
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

1 Dollar 1982

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Thunnus. It is a genus of ocean-dwelling ray-finned bony fish from the Scombridae (Mackerel) family.

Avers:

1 Dollar 1982

HM The Queen Elizabeth II HM The Queen Elizabeth II.

This portrait of Her Majesty is adapted from a photograph, taken prior to a Royal Tour of India and Pakistan by Anthony Buckley in October 1960, and it is one of the more widely used images of The Queen.(Peter Symes)

I found this image here "National Portrait Gallery". The portrait on banknote is, probably, taken from this photo session.

Her Majesty is shown wearing Queen Alexandra's Kokoshnik Tiara, the King George VI Festoon Necklace, and Queen Mary's Floret Earrings.

Tiara

The Kokoshnik Tiara, which is sometimes known as the Russian Fringe Tiara, was designed in the style of a Russian peasant girl's headdress. The design of the Kokoshnik tiara was based on a similar tiara, owned by Queen Alexandra's sister, The Empress of Russia. Created by "Garrard", the tiara has sixty-one platinum bars set with 488 diamonds. The tiara was presented to Queen Alexandra, while still a princess, on the occasion of her silver wedding anniversary. It was a gift from three hundred and sixty-five peeresses of the realm. The Festoon Necklace was created from one hundred and five diamonds, at the request of King George VI, from diamonds he inherited on becoming King.

The George VI Festoon Necklace

In 1950, King George VI had a diamond necklace created for his daughter Princess Elizabeth using 105 loose collets that were among the Crown heirlooms he inherited. (These, according to Hugh Roberts, had been used by Queen Mary to change the lengths of her multiple diamond collet necklaces, hence their loose status in the collection.) The end result is this take on a triple strand necklace: three strands of graduated collets suspended between two diamond triangles, with a single collet strand at the back. This is also called simply the Queen’s Festoon Necklace, though I’ll use George VI’s name to be a little more specific.

Even though her collection of diamond necklaces has vastly increased since 1950, this is still a favorite with the Queen and she wears it on a fairly regular basis."From her Majesty's Jewel vault".

Queen Mary's Floret Earrings

These diamond and platinum earrings are another example of the multiple changes Queen Mary made to her jewels. The large central stones are the Mackinnon diamonds, a pair of solitaire earrings that were a wedding gift from Sir William Mackinnon to Mary for her wedding in 1893.

The stones were then set as the center of another pair, Queen Mary's Cluster Earrings. Later on, they were replaced and a new setting was created by Garrard, Queen Mary's Floret Earrings. In their new setting, each one is surrounded by seven slightly smaller diamonds. The earrings were inherited by the Queen on Queen Mary's death in 1953. She wears them for occasions like the State Opening of Parliament, the Garter Day ceremony, and other formal events. "From her Majesty's Jewel vault".

The Coat of arms of Bermuda is in the middle.

coat of arms

The coat of arms of Bermuda depicts a red lion holding a shield that has a depiction of a wrecked ship upon it. The red lion is a symbol of England and alludes to Bermuda’s relationship with that country. The wrecked ship is the Sea Venture, the flagship of the Virginia Company. The ship was deliberately driven on to the reefs of Bermuda, by Admiral Sir George Somers, in 1609, to prevent it from foundering in a storm. All aboard survived, resulting in the settlement of the island. The Latin motto under the coat of arms, Quo Fata Ferunt, means “Whither the Fates Carry [Us]”.

Yellow lily

Behind the Queen (right in the corner) is Water Lily (Nymphaea spp). Also called the pond lily or Egyptian lily. Named after water nymphs in Greek mythology who lived in ponds and secluded lakes. Samples can be seen in the City Hall fountain.

Bermuda Petrel

On the background is the Bermuda Petrel (Pterodroma cahow) is a gadfly petrel. Commonly known in Bermuda as the Cahow, a name derived from its eerie cries, this nocturnal ground-nesting seabird is the national bird of Bermuda, and a symbol of hope for nature conservation. It was thought extinct for 330 years. The dramatic rediscovery in 1951 of eighteen nesting pairs made this a "Lazarus species", that is, a species found to be alive after having been considered extinct for centuries.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words in center.

Revers:

1 Dollar 1982

On the top - the view on Bermuda's capital, Hamilton.

On the background is Bermuda's Dinghy sailing.

Dinghy

Dinghy sailing is the activity of sailing small boats by using five essential controls:

the sails

the foils (i.e. the daggerboard or centreboard and rudder and sometimes lifting foils as found on the Moth).

the trim (forward/rear angle of the boat in the water)

side to side balance of the dinghy by hiking or movement of the crew, particularly in windy weather ("move fast or swim").

the choice of route (in terms of existing and anticipated wind shifts, possible obstacles, other water traffic, currents, tides etc.).

A dinghy (or dingey) is a type of small boat, often carried or towed for use as a ship's boat by a larger vessel. It is a loanword from either Bengali or Urdu. Utility dinghies are usually rowboats or have an outboard motor, but some are rigged for sailing.

Denominations are in top right and lower left corners, also lower right in words.

Comments:

Interesting fact:

Bermuda named after their discoverer, the Spanish explorer Juan Bermudez, who visited them in 1503. However, sharpen its focus on them the Spaniards did not. And in 1609 there appeared the English colonists. The reason for their appearance - a shipwreck. Officially Bermuda are ruled England from 1684.