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5 Pesos 1985, Cuba

in Krause book Number: P-FX7
Years of issue: 1985
Edition: --
Signatures: no signature
Serie: Exchange certificates
Specimen of: 1985
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 135 х 62
Printer: Los Talleres de Grabado en Acero y Timbre del Estado de La Habana, STC-P

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

5 Pesos 1985

Description

Watermark:

Avers:

5 Pesos 1985

On the left side is the seal (emblem) of Cuban National Bank (Banco National de Cuba) - the coat of arms and five-pointed star on background.

On the right side is letter B - as definition of Series. Series B was intended for nationals from capitalist countries. Rate of Exchange: 1 Peso = 1 US$. Not transferable.

Denominations are in all corners and centered.

Revers:

5 Pesos 1985

Castillo de los Tres Reyes Magos del MorroMorro Castle (Castillo de los Tres Reyes Magos del Morro) as it looks back in 1630, when its construction were completed.

The tower of Morro Castle is presented on the coat of arms of Havana.

Morro Castle Spanish: Castillo de los Tres Reyes Magos del Morro, named after the three biblical Magi, is a fortress guarding the entrance to Havana bay in Havana, Cuba. The design was drawn up by the Italian engineer Juan Bautista Antonelli; originally under the control of Spain, the fortress was captured by the British in 1762, and was returned to the Spanish under treaty terms a year later.

The Morro fortress in Havana shares its name with structures in Santiago de Cuba and the Castillo de San Felipe del Morro in San Juan, Puerto Rico. In this case, the Spanish "morro" means a rock which is very visible from the sea and therefore serves as a navigational landmark. Perched on the promontory on the opposite side of the harbor from Old Havana, it can be viewed from miles around as it dominates the port entrance. Built initially in 1589 in response to raids on Havana harbor, el Morro protected the mouth of the harbor with a chain being strung out across the water to the fort at La Punta.

It first saw action in 1762, while under the command of Luis Vicente de Velasco e Isla. The British expedition against Cuba under Lord Albemarle landed in Cojimar to the east of Havana and attacked the fortress from its landward side. The fort fell when the British successfully mined one of its bastions. When the British handed the island back in 1763 to Spain, the fortress at La Cabaña was built to prevent this from happening again.

Inside the gates is an exhibition on the lighthouses of Cuba - El Morro once housed a school for lighthouse keepers. There was actually a watchtower here until the British blew it up during their successful siege in 1762. The Faro Castillo del Morro lighthouse was added in 1846.

The cannons around the fort are now badly rusted, but the walls are well preserved. The fort has central barracks up to four stories high. A small underwater archeology exhibition is also located here. Noteworthy are the old latrines and their chute into the sea, as are the two sets of doors and the drawbridge mechanism. The current harbor master's office is still housed in the fortress. A plaque dedicated by the ambassador of the United Kingdom commemorates the 1762 siege, and a small memorial is located between two strong powder rooms in the northeast bastion.

A small turret at the end of the wall offers views of the sea crashing onto the rocks 20 meters below, and of the huge dry moat. The opposite side of the moat holds more modern guns and cannons, La Bateria de Velasco, and offers a sweeping view down to Cojimar.

Denominations are in all corners and centered.

Comments:

"Series B" Issue!