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50 Mark 1960, Germany

in Krause book Number: 21a
Years of issue: 18.06.1962
Edition: --
Signatures: Bundesbank Präsident: Dr. rer. pol. h.c. Karl Blessing (01.01.1958 - 31.12.1969), Vizepräsident: Dr. Heinrich Troeger
Serie: Serie 1960
Specimen of: 02.01.1960
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 150 х 75
Printer: Bundesdruckerei GmbH, Berlin

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

50 Mark 1960

Description

Watermark:

watermark

"Hans Urmiller with his son" by Barthel Beham, 1525.

Avers:

50 Mark 1960

Hans Urmiller with his sonThe engraving on banknote is made after the portrait "Hans Urmiller with his son" by Barthel Beham, 1525. The painting hangs in Frankfurt's Städel-Museum.

Barthel Beham (or Bartel) (1502-1540) was a German engraver, miniaturist and painter.

The younger brother of Hans Sebald Beham, he was born into a family of artists in Nuremberg. Learning his art from his elder brother, and Albrecht Dürer, he was particularly active as an engraver during the 1520s, creating tiny works of magnificent detail, positioning him in the German printmaking school known as the "Little Masters". He was also fascinated with antiquity and may have worked with Marcantonio Raimondi in Bologna and Rome at some time in his career.

In 1525, along with his brother and Georg Pencz, the so-called "godless painters", he was banished from Lutheran Nuremberg for asserting his disbelief in baptism, Christ, or transubstantiation. Although later pardoned, he moved to Catholic Munich to work for the Bavarian dukes William IV and Ludwig X. Whilst there, his exceptional talent established him as one of Germany's principal portrait painters, favoured by distinguished patrons such as Emperor Charles V.

According to Joachim von Sandrart, he died in Italy during a trip under the patronage of Duke William.

Revers:

50 Mark 1960

Holsten Gate Holsten GateThe Holsten Gate in Lübeck symbolizes the German civic pride.

The Holsten Gate ("Holstein Tor", later "Holstentor") is a city gate marking off the western boundary of the old center of the Hanseatic city of Lübeck. This Brick Gothic construction is one of the relics of Lübeck’s medieval city fortifications and one of two remaining city gates, the other being the Citadel Gate ("Burgtor"). Because its two round towers and arched entrance are so well known it is regarded today as a symbol of this German city, and together with the old city center (Altstadt) of Lübeck. it has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987.

Holsten Gate Holsten Gateolsten Gate is one of the most famous sights in Lübeck. When visiting the City of the 7 Spires take a moment to admire its symbol standing at the entrance to the old town.

Beside the Brandenburg Gate, Cologne Cathedral and the Church of Our Lady in Munich, the Holsten Gate in Lübeck is the most famous German building in the world.

In medieval times, Lübeck was considered to be an important city and owes its thanks to the success of the Lübeck merchants. Holsten Gate became the proud symbol of Lübeck as a free imperial city.

The city gate was built between 1464 and 1478 along the lines of Dutch models. Its purpose served both as a form of defence and as a form of prestige. Above the round-arched gateway entrance of the twin-towered construction, the inscription "CONCORDIA DOMI FORIS PAX" ("unity at home, peace abroad") can clearly be seen in golden letters.

Nearly every visitor is astonished by its odd leaning angle and its sunken south tower. But, during the XV century people weren't quite as knowledgeable on "foundation work" as they are today. As only the towers are standing on a "gridiron" with the heavy middle tract resting upon them, the towers unevenly subsided into the marshy ground. In 1863, the Gate looked an appalling sight. With a majority of just one single vote, the city parliament decided to restore the gate and began extensive restoration efforts. It wasn't until 70 years later that the subsidence could be stopped. Most recent renovations were carried out between 2004 and 2006. Here, the slate roof, terracotta frieze and parts of the brickwork were replaced.

Two majestic lions stand guarding the city in front of the Holsten Gate. (www.luebeck-tourism.de)

The inscription on the right top: "Wer Banknoten nachmacht oder verfälscht oder nachgemachte oder verfälschte sich verschafft und in Verkehr bringt, wird mit Zuchthaus nicht unter zwei Jahren bestraft".

Translation reads: "Those who forge bank notes or runs the counterfeit into circulation will be subject to imprisonment for at least two years."

DM printed until 1963 (then have been changed the interpretation of this article in the German law) instead of the word "Freiheitsstrafe" (deprivation of freedom) have the word "Zuchthaus" (penitentiary). At that time, the notion of a house of correction has become obsolete, so it was replaced.

Among the collectors the third series of banknotes (Series 1960) with the word "Zuchthaus" valued much higher then releases of the same series in 1970, 1977 and 1980. Although, in general, all notes in this series are valued higher then exchange rate, according to which, by the way, the Bundesbank still takes them for exchange to Euro.

Comments:

Holsten GateIn my collection I also found 2 Euro 2006 commemorative coin with the Holsten Gate in Lübeck.

The signatures on banknote belongs to:

Karl BlessingKarl Blessing (05.02.1900 - 25.04.1971).

Heinrich TroegerHeinrich Troeger (4 March 1901 - 28 August 1975).

Hermann EidenbenzGraphic artist: Hermann Eidenbenz.

Hermann Eidenbenz (September 4, 1902 - 25 February 1993) was a Swiss graphic artist and stamp artist.

The time of his birth his father managed several companies in India, his mother came from Germany (Schwaben). But he received his education in Switzerland.

His training as a graphic artist took place in Switzerland, first at "Orell Füssli" in Zurich and then in the School of Applied Arts in Zurich. 1923 was followed by a stay abroad at "Deffke and Hadank" in Berlin. As early as 1926 he became a teacher of writing and graphics at the arts and crafts school in Magdeburg. He practiced six years of this profession before he opened his own graphic studio in Basel with his brothers - Reinhold and Willi. In 1937 he was involved in the Pavilion of Switzerland for the World Exhibition in Paris from 1940 to 1943 he taught at the general trade school in Basel.

For Haas'sche type foundry he designed in 1945 the Graphique Font, in 1950 was followed by the Clarendon Font. Today these fonts are available from Linotype Library.

In 1953 he returned to Germany and became head of the department of commercial art at Werkkunstschule, in Braunschweig. In 1955 he joined the company "Fa.Reemtsma", in Hamburg, there to act as artistic collaborator.

He created numerous logos and posters. This also includes the logo of "Basler Verkehrsbetriebe" (BVB). The supported by two arms of Basilisk in Basel graced so many BVB vehicles than any other Signet before or since. In 1947 thus drove the first motor car. In addition Eidenbenz took over even the graphic design of the car numbers used from 1947 until today.

He created for Switzerland and for Germany In addition, banknotes and stamps. So he designed the first series of the D-Mark banknotes, issued by the Deutsche Bundesbank and the fifth series of banknotes of the Swiss franc, which came into circulation from 1956. The stamp of the German Post Office for the 100th anniversary of Carl Friedrich Gauss from 1955 was designed by him.