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10 Dollars 2009, United States of America

in Krause book Number: 525
Years of issue: 2009
Edition: --
Signatures: Secretary of Treasury: Timothy F.Geithner, Treasurer: Rosa Gumataotao Rios
Serie: 2009 Issue
Specimen of: 02.03.2006
Material: 75 % Cotton, 25 % Linen
Size (mm): 156 х 66
Printer: Bureau of Engraving and Printing, U.S. Department of the Treasury

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** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

10 Dollars 2009

Description

Watermark:

watermark 10

Hold the note to light to see a faint image of Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton to the right of his large portrait. It can be seen from both sides of the bill.

Avers:

10 Dollars 2009

Alexander HamiltonThe engraving on banknote is made after this portrait of Alexander Hamilton by American painter John Trumbull. This was painted in 1805, the year after Hamilton’s death, and Trumbull used various accumulated drawings as its basis.

Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was a founding father of the United States, chief staff aide to General George Washington, one of the most influential interpreters and promoters of the U.S. Constitution, the founder of the nation's financial system, and the founder of the Federalist Party, the world's first voter-based political party. As Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton was the primary author of the economic policies of the George Washington administration. Hamilton took the lead in the funding of the states' debts by the Federal government, the establishment of a national bank, a system of tariffs, and friendly trade relations with Britain. He led the Federalist Party, created largely in support of his views; he was opposed by the Democratic-Republican Party, led by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison; it despised Britain and feared that Hamilton's policies of a strong central government would weaken the American commitment to Republicanism.

Born out of wedlock to a Scottish-French mother and raised in the West Indies, Hamilton was orphaned at about age 11. Recognized for his abilities and talent, rich sponsors helped him get started, He was sent King's College (now Columbia University), in New York City. Hamilton played a major role in the American Revolutionary War. At the start of the war in 1775, he organized an artillery company. He soon became the senior aide to General Washington, the American forces' commander-in-chief. Washington sent him on numerous important missions to tell generals what Washington wanted. After the war, Hamilton was elected to the Congress of the Confederation from New York. He resigned, to practice law, and founded the Bank of New York. Hamilton was among those dissatisfied with the Weaken national government. He led the Annapolis Convention, which successfully influenced Congress to issue a call for the Philadelphia Convention, in order to create a new constitution. He was an active participant at Philadelphia; and he helped achieve ratification by writing 51 of the 85 installments of the The Federalist Papers. To this day, is the single most important reference for Constitutional interpretation.

Hamilton became the leading cabinet member in the new government under President Washington. Hamilton was a nationalist, who emphasized strong central government and successfully argued that the implied powers of the Constitution provided the legal authority to fund the national debt, assume states' debts, and create the government-owned Bank of the United States. These programs were funded primarily by a tariff on imports, and later also by a highly controversial tax on whiskey. Facing well-organized opposition from Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, Hamilton mobilized a nationwide network of friends of the government, especially bankers and businessmen. It became the Federalist Party. A major issue splitting the parties was the Jay Treaty, largely designed by Hamilton in 1794. It established friendly economic relations with Britain to the chagrin of France and the supporters of the French Revolution. Hamilton played a central role in the Federalist party, which dominated national and state politics until it was overthrown by Jefferson in 1800.

In 1795 he returned to the practice of law in New York. He tried to control the policies of President Adams (1797-1801). In 1798-99, Hamilton called for mobilization against France after the XYZ Affair and became commander of a new army, which he readied for war. However, the Quasi-War, while hard-fought at sea, was never officially declared and did not involve army action. In the end, Adams found a diplomatic solution which avoided a war With France. Hamilton's opposition to Adams' re-election helped cause his defeat in the 1800 election. When Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied for the presidency in the electoral college in 1801, Hamilton helped to defeat Burr, whom he found unprincipled, and to elect Jefferson despite philosophical differences. Hamilton continued his legal and business activities in New York City, but lost much of his national prominence within the Federalist party. When Vice President Burr ran for governor of New York state in 1802, Hamilton crusaded against him as unworthy. Taking offense at some of Hamilton's comments, Burr challenged him to a duel and mortally wounded Hamilton, who died the next day.

The oval borders and fine lines surrounding the portrait of Secretary Hamilton on the front, and the United States Treasury Building vignette on the back, have been removed. The portrait has been moved up and shoulders have been extended into the border. Additional engraving details have been added to the vignette background.

A symbol of freedom representing an icon of Americana has been added to the redesigned $10 bill. Two images of the torch carried by the Statue of Liberty are printed in red on the front of the redesigned bill. A large image of the torch is printed in the background to the left of the portrait of Secretary Hamilton, while a second, smaller metallic red image of the torch can be found on the lower right side of the portrait. The symbols of freedom differ for each denomination.

Numeral 10 in the lower right-hand corner changes color from copper to green. The color shift is more dramatic on the redesigned currency, making it even easier for people to check their money.

A universal seal to the left of the portrait represents the entire Federal Reserve System. A letter and number beneath the left serial number identifies the issuing Federal Reserve Bank. There are 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks and 24 branches located in major cities throughout the United States.

The unique combination of eleven numbers and letters appears twice on the front of the bill. On the redesigned United States ten dollar bill ($10), the left serial number has shifted slightly to the right, compared with previous designs. Because they are unique identifiers, serial numbers help law enforcement identify counterfeit notes, and they also help the Bureau of Engraving and Printing track quality standards for the notes they produce.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words lower, centered.

Revers:

10 Dollars 2009

United States Department of the Treasury

The Department of the Treasury (DoT) is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government. It was established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage government revenue. The Department is administered by the Secretary of the Treasury, who is a member of the Cabinet. Jack Lew is the current Secretary of the Treasury; he was sworn in on February 28, 2013.

The first Secretary of the Treasury was Alexander Hamilton, who was sworn into office on September 11, 1789. Hamilton was asked by President George Washington to serve after first having asked Robert Morris (who declined, recommending Hamilton instead). Hamilton almost single-handedly worked out the nation's early financial system, and for several years was a major presence in Washington's administration as well. His portrait is on the obverse of the U.S. ten-dollar bill while the Treasury Department building is shown on the reverse.

Besides the Secretary, one of the best-known Treasury officials is the Treasurer of the United States whose signature, along with the Treasury Secretary's, appears on all Federal Reserve notes.

The Treasury prints and mints all paper currency and coins in circulation through the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the United States Mint. The Department also collects all federal taxes through the Internal Revenue Service, and manages U.S. government debt instruments.

An inscription: "In God we trust" is above.

"In God We Trust" is the official motto of the United States. It was adopted as the nation's motto in 1956 as an alternative or replacement to the unofficial motto of E pluribus unum, which was adopted when the Great Seal of the United States was created and adopted in 1782. Many people have expressed objections to its use, and have sought to have the religious reference removed from the currency, claiming that it violates the First Amendment.

"In God we trust" first appeared on U.S. coins in 1864 and has appeared on paper currency since 1957. A law passed in a Joint Resolution by the 84th Congress (P.L. 84-140) and approved by President Dwight Eisenhower on July 30, 1956 declared "IN GOD WE TRUST" must appear on currency. This phrase was first used on paper money in 1957, when it appeared on the one-dollar silver certificate. The first paper currency bearing the phrase entered circulation on October 1, 1957.

The numeral 10 in the lower corner on the back of the bill is enlarged to help those with visual impairments distinguish the denomination.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners, also repeatedly on background. In words lower, centered.

Comments:

Printed by Federal Reserve branch in Richmond, VA (Code E is in top center, on obverse, under the word RESERVE).

Because they are so small, microprinted words are hard to replicate. The redesigned United States ten dollar bill ($10) features microprinting on the front of the bill in three areas: the word USA and the numeral 10 can be found repeated beneath the large printed torch and the words THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and TEN DOLLARS can be found below the portrait, as well as vertically inside the left and right borders of the bill.

Hold the United States ten dollar bill ($10) to light to make sure there's a small thread embedded in the paper. The words USA TEN and a small flag are visible in tiny print. It runs vertically to the right of the portrait and can be seen from both sides of the bill. This thread glows orange when illuminated by ultraviolet light.