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100 Schilling 1984, Austria

in Krause book Number: 150
Years of issue: 02.01.1984 (1985)
Edition: --
Signatures: Generalrat: Dr. Helmuth Klaus, Präsident: Dr. Stefan Koren, Generaldirektor: Dr. Heinz Kienzl
Serie: 1983 - 1988 Issue
Specimen of: 02.01.1984
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 137 х 68,5
Printer: Oesterreichische Banknoten und Sicherheitsdruck, Wien

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

100 Schilling 1984

Description

Watermark:

Watermark

Austrian coat of arms.

Avers:

100 Schilling 1984

Akademie WissenschaftEugen Böhm Ritter von Bawerk (12 February 1851 - 27 August 1914) was an Austrian economist who made important contributions to the development of the Austrian School of economics.

He was the Austrian Minister of Finance intermittently from 1895-1904, and also wrote a series of extensive critiques of Marxism.

Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk was one of the leading members of the Austrian school of economics-an approach to economic thought founded by Carl Menger and augmented by Knut Wicksell, Ludwig von Mises, Friedrich A. Hayek, and Sir John Hicks. Böhm-Bawerk’s work became so well known that before World War I, his Marxist contemporaries regarded the Austrians as their typical bourgeois, intellectual enemies. His theories of interest and capital were catalysts in the development of economics, but today his original work receives little attention. (Library of Economics and Liberty).

Lower left is a Caduceus, as a symbol of commerce.

The caduceus is the staff, carried by Hermes, in Greek mythology. The same staff was also borne by heralds in general, for example by Iris, the messenger of Hera. It is a short staff entwined by two serpents, sometimes surmounted by wings. In Roman iconography, it was often depicted being carried in the left hand of Mercury, the messenger of the gods, guide of the dead and protector of merchants, shepherds, gamblers, liars, and thieves.

As a symbolic object, it represents Hermes (or the Roman Mercury), and by extension trades, occupations, or undertakings associated with the god. In later Antiquity, the caduceus provided the basis for the astrological symbol representing the planet Mercury. Thus, through its use in astrology and alchemy, it has come to denote the elemental metal of the same name. It is said the wand would wake the sleeping and send the awake to sleep. If applied to the dying, their death was gentle; if applied to the dead, they returned to life.

Top left is the coat of arms.

coat

The current coat of arms of Austria, albeit without the broken chains, has been in use by the Republic of Austria since 1919. Between 1934 and the German annexation in 1938 Austria used a different coat of arms, which consisted of a double-headed eagle. The establishment of the Second Republic in 1945 saw the return of the original (First Republic) arms, with broken chains added to symbolise Austria's liberation.

The blazon of the Federal Arms of the Republic of Austria reads:

Gules a fess Argent, escutcheon on the breast of an eagle displayed Sable, langued Gules, beaked Or, crowned with a mural crown of three visible merlons Or, armed Or, dexter talon holding sickle, sinister talon holding hammer, both talons shackled with chain broken Argent.

The symbols and emblems used in the Austrian arms are as follows:

The Eagle: Austria's sovereignty (introduced 1919)

The escutcheon Emblem of Austria (late Middle Ages, reintroduced 1915)

The mural crown: The middle class (introduced 1919)

The sickle: Agriculture (introduced 1919)

The Hammer: Industry (introduced 1919)

The broken chains: Liberation from National Socialist dictatorship (added 1945).

Denominations in numerals are in three corners and at right field of banknote as background. In words top, centered.

Revers:

100 Schilling 1984

Akademie Wissenschaft Akademie WissenschaftThe main building of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Akademie der Wissenschaften), the president of which Böhm-Bawerk was from 1911.

The Austrian Academy of Sciences (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften) is a legal entity under the special protection of the Republic of Austria. According to the statutes of the Academy its mission is to promote the sciences and humanities in every respect and in every field, particularly in fundamental research. In 2009, the Austrian Academy of Sciences was ranked 82nd among the 300 topmost research institutions in the world, based on its internet presence, by Webometrics Ranking of World Research Centers.

A little bit of history:

In 1713, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz suggested to establish such an Academy, inspired by the Royal Society and the Académie des Sciences. The "Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenschaften in Wien" was finally established by Imperial Patent on May 14, 1847.

The Academy soon began extensive research. In the humanities the Academy started with researching and publishing important historical sources of Austria. Research in natural sciences also covered a wide variety of topics.

The 1921 federal law guaranteed the legal basis of the Academy in the newly founded First Republic of Austria. And from the mid-1960s onwards it became the country's leading institution in the field of non-university basic research.

The Academy is also a learned society, and its past members have included Christian Doppler, Theodor Billroth, Anton Eiselsberg, Eduard Suess, Ludwig Boltzmann, Paul Kretschmer, Hans Horst Meyer, Roland Scholl, and the Nobel Prize winners Julius Wagner-Jauregg, Victor Hess, Erwin Schrödinger and Konrad Lorenz.

Among the Academy's numerous publications are the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum and eco.mont - Journal on Protected Mountain Areas Research and Management.

Denominations in numerals are in three corners. In words lower, centered.

Comments:

Issued at January 2, 1984.

Put into circulation on October 14, 1985.

Austria - one of the first states to use in their own monetary system hologram as a means of protection.

Designer: Robert Kalina.

Robert Kalina (born 29 June 1955) is an Austrian designer. For the National Bank of Austria he created the T 382 design, which was the winning design of the 1996 competition for the art shown on the euro banknotes. Kalina's design was chosen by the EMI Council (European Monetary Institute) on 3 December 1996. Kalina also designed the banknotes for the Azerbaijani manat, the 2010 series of the Syrian Pound and the Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark.