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500 Gulden 2000, Suriname

in Krause book Number: 150
Years of issue: 01.01.2000 - 01.01.2004
Edition: --
Signatures: President: Henk Otmar Goedschalk (in office January 1985 to January 1994 and January 1997 to August 2000)
Serie: Birds and Flowers
Specimen of: 01.01.2000
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 140 х 70
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

500 Gulden 2000

Description

Watermark:

bank building watermark

The building of Central Bank of Suriname was built in XVIII century. Right now I still looking for some additional info about this building.

In two rows an abbreviation of central bank of Suriname - CBVS.

In UV - denomination 500 in a square. The bird and the tree branch are yellow.

Avers:

500 Gulden 2000

Mandevilla splendens

Native to southeastern Brazil, Mandevilla splendens is an ornamental vine enjoyed as a garden plant in mild climate areas around the world. Mandevilla splendens is an evergreen creeper which climbs by twining and can grow to 3 meters high. It has wide green leaves of elliptical or rectangular shape which grow to 20 cm long. The flowers are pink or white with yellow centers, and it flowers from late spring to early summer.

Central Bank of Suriname

The building of Central Bank of Suriname.

On the right side is a logo of Surinamese Bank.

Fulgora laternaria

Lower left is, presumably, Fulgora laternaria. Presented as a combined image (on the obverse and reverse).

It is a planthopper known by a large variety of common names including lantern fly, peanut bug, peanut-headed lanternfly, alligator bug, machaca, chicharra-machacuy, cocoposa (in Spain) and jequitiranaboia (in the Amazon region and elsewhere in Brazil).

In several countries, such as Ecuador, Colombia and Venezuela, there exists the myth that if somebody is bitten by the machaca, he or she must have sex within 24 hours to prevent an otherwise incurable death. The popular belief in Bolivia (Santa Cruz de la Sierra) is that it is a dangerous insect dependant on its wing colours but the insect is actually harmless to people. This species inhabits tropical rainforests in Mexico, Central America and South America.

Denomination in numeral top left. In numeral and words bottom right.

Revers:

500 Gulden 2000

The Guianan Cock-of-the-rock

The Guianan Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola rupicola) is a species of South American passerine. It is about 30 centimeters (12 in) in length and weighs about 200 to 220 grams (7.1 to 7.8 oz). They are found in tropical rainforests, near its preferred habitat of rocky outcrops. The males plumage is bright orange and the males have a prominent half-moon crest. The females are brownish in colour, and are generally much duller coloured than the males. It is one of two species of the genus Rupicola, the other being the Andean Cock-of-the-rock. The Guianan Cock-of-the-rock lives across the forested region of northeastern South America.

Urania leilus

Top left, presumably, Urania leilus.

The Green-banded Urania (Urania leilus) is a day-flying moth of the Uraniidae family. It is found in tropical South America east of the Andes, including Suriname, French Guiana, east Colombia, Venezuela, east Ecuador, Brazil, north Bolivia, east Peru, and Trinidad. It has been recorded as a vagrant to the central and northern Lesser Antilles such as St. Kitts, Barbados and Dominica. The habitat consists of riverbanks in primary and secondary rainforest at elevations between sea level and about 800 m (2,600 ft).

It is made by red color on banknote. Have no idea why.

Top right are the coat of arms of Surinam and a map of Brokopondo Reservoir region.

The Brokopondo Reservoir, officially named "Professor Doctor Ingenieur W. J. van Blommestein Meer", and also called the Brokopondostuwmeer, is a large reservoir in the South American country Suriname. It is named after the Surakarta-born Dutch hydrological engineer Willem Johan van Blommestein. With a surface area of approximately 1,560 km² (602 mi²), depending on the current water level, it is one of the largest reservoirs in the world, flooding nearly one percent of the country.

The coat of arms of Suriname

The coat of arms of Suriname was adopted on 25 November 1975. The motto reads Justitia - Pietas - Fides (“Justice - Piety - Fidelity”). It further consists of two natives who carry a shield. The left half of the shield symbolizes the past, as slaves were abducted via ship out of Africa. The right half, the side of the present, shows a Royal palm, also the symbol of a just person ("The just person should blossom like a palm"). The diamond in the middle is the stylized form of the heart, which is regarded as the organ of love. The points of the diamond show the four directions of the wind. Inside the diamond is a five-pointed star. This star symbolizes the five continents from which the inhabitants of Suriname migrated: Africa, America, Australia, Asia, and Europe.

Denominations in numerals are top left and bottom right.

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