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1 Dollar 1980, Bahamas

in Krause book Number: 35b
Years of issue: 1980
Edition: 11 215 057
Signatures: Governor: Mr. William C. Allen (1980-1987)
Serie: 1974 Central bank Act
Specimen of: 1965
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 156 х 67
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

1 Dollar 1980

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Lobatus gigas, commonly known as the queen conch, is a species of large edible sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusc in the family of true conchies, the Strombidae. This species is one of the largest molluscs native to the tropical northwestern Atlantic, from Bermuda to Brazil, reaching up to 35.2 centimeters (13.9 in) in shell length. L. gigas is closely related to the Goliath conch, Lobatus Goliath, a species endemic to Brazil, as well as the rooster conch, Lobatus gallus.

Avers:

1 Dollar 1980

Photo by Dorothy Wilding, 26 February 1952, HM The Queen Elizabeth II

HM The Queen Elizabeth II.

The first official photographic sitting with the new Queen was granted to the society photographer Dorothy Wilding. It took place on 26 February 1952, just twenty days after the accession. A total of fifty-nine photographs were taken by Wilding, showing The Queen dressed in a variety of gowns designed by Norman Hartnell and wearing jewellery including the Diamond Diadem. The photographs taken during this sitting were the basis of The Queen’s image on postage stamps from 1953 until 1971, as well as providing the official portrait of The Queen which was sent to every British embassy throughout the world. (Royal collection trust)

Diadem

The Queen is wearing the George IV State Diadem. Made by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell (and likely designed by their designer, Philip Liebart) in 1820, the diadem features a set of 4 crosses pattée alternating with 4 bouquets of roses, thistles, and shamrocks. The motifs are set on a band of diamond scrollwork between two bands of pearls. Queen Alexandra had the diadem made smaller in 1902, reducing the top band of pearls from 86 to 81, and the bottom band from 94 to 88. The front cross is set with a 4 carat yellow diamond, and the piece features 1,333 diamonds in all. (Sartorial Splendor)

Necklace present from Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar

The necklace worn by The Queen, of diamond flowers and leaves, was a wedding present from Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar. The necklace was originally crafted in 1930s by Cartier. It was a wedding gift to Queen Elizabeth II, who was still a princess, on her wedding to Prince Philip from the Last Nizam of Hyderabad, Mir Osman Ali Khan in 1947. The Nizam of Hyderabad asked the Queen to choose two pieces from Cartier to mark her wedding, and she chose a tiara and a matching necklace based on an English rose.

The necklace was made by Cartier with 38 diamonds, with a diamond-encrusted snap. It has a detachable double-drop pendant, made of 13 emerald-cut diamonds and a pear-shaped drop, forms the pave-set center of the necklace. The design was based on English roses.

Pair of pearl drop earrings, circa 1947

Pair of pearl drop earrings, made circa 1947.

The pearls used to create these earrings were a wedding present to Princess Elizabeth in 1947 from the Sheikh of Bahrain. The diamonds used in the earrings use a variety of modern cuts. (A Royal Wedding 1947)

In these portraits she is woman first and Queen second. However, the beauty of Her Majesty in these images has been enhanced by the engraver. The original portrait, while very flattering, represents Her Majesty in a more regal aspect and with, perhaps, less distinct facial features. (Peter Symes)

Lower, centered, are the royal palm leaves.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words centered.

Revers:

1 Dollar 1980

The Coat of Arms of the Bahamas

The Coat of Arms of the Bahamas on the right.

The Coat of Arms of the Bahamas contains a shield with the national symbols as its focal point.

The escutcheon (shield) is supported by a marlin and flamingo. The crest on top of the helm (helmet) is a conch shell, which represents the varied marine life of the island chain. Below the helm is the escutcheon itself, whose main charge is a ship, reputed to represent the Santa Maria of Christopher Columbus. It is sailing beneath a sun in the chief. The animals supporting the shield are the national animals, and the national motto is found at the bottom. The flamingo is located upon land, and the marlin upon sea, indicating the geography of the islands.

The vibrant tinctures of the coat of arms are also intended to point to a bright future for the islands. They are also reputed to have been maintained for their attractiveness to tourists.

The Coat of Arms was approved by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II on 7 December 1971 for use by the Bahamian People and the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. It was designed by Bahamian artist and clergyman, Rev. Dr. Hervis L. Bain, Jr., who is also a Member of the Order of the British Empire.

Tecoma stans

On the left - Tecoma stans or Yellow Elder is a species of flowering perennial shrub in the trumpet vine family, Bignoniaceae, that is native to the Americas. Common names include yellow trumpet bush, yellow bells, yellow elder, ginger - thomas. Tecoma stans is the official flower of the United States Virgin Islands and the floral emblem of the Bahamas.

The Yellow Elder was chosen as the national flower of the Bahamas because it is native to the Bahama Islands, and it blooms throughout the year.

Selection of the yellow elder over many other flowers was made through the combined popular vote of members of all four of New Providence's garden clubs of the 1970s - the Nassau Garden Club, the Carver Garden Club, the International Garden Club, and the Y.W.C.A. Garden Club.

They reasoned that other flowers grown there - such as the bougainvillea, hibiscus, and poinciana - had already been chosen as the national flowers of other countries. The yellow elder, on the other hand, was unclaimed by other countries (although it is now also the national flower of the United States Virgin Islands).

Corals and fish are in the middle.

Agelas citrina or Citron SpongeLower is Agelas citrina or Citron Sponge.

A thick encrusing and lobed sponge, bright orange in artificial light, and commonly up to 1 meter across. These sponges have a very irregular shape.

The French angelfish (Pomacanthus paru)Above it is the French angelfish (Pomacanthus paru).

The French angelfish, Pomacanthus paru, is a large angelfish of the family Pomacanthidae, found in the western Atlantic from New York and the Bahamas to Brazil, and also the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, including the Antilles, Roatan, and the eastern Atlantic from around Ascension Island and St. Paul's Rocks, at depths of between 2 and 100 m. Length is up to 41 cm.

The French angelfish is common in shallow reefs, occurs usually in pairs often near sea fans. It feeds on sponges, algae, bryozoans, zoantharians, gorgonians and tunicates. Juveniles tend cleaning stations where they service a broad range of clients, including jacks, snappers, morays, grunts, surgeonfishes, and wrasses. At the station the cleaner displays a fluttering swimming and when cleaning it touches the clients with its pelvic fins.

The adult background coloration is black but the scales of the body, except those at the front from nape to abdomen, are rimmed with golden yellow. Furthermore the pectoral fins have a broad orange-yellow bar, the dorsal filament is yellow, the chin is whitish, the outer part of the iris is yellow, and the eye is narrowly rimmed below with blue. Juveniles are black with vertical yellow bands.

This species is oviparous and monogamous. Spawning pairs are strongly territorial and usually both partners defend vigorously their territory against neighboring pairs. During the day you will mostly see these fish out and about, but come night they seek shelter in their designated hiding spot where they return every night.

The flesh of the French angel has good taste and the fish is sold on fish markets. The species has been reared in captivity.

Sponges constitute 70% of the species' diet and since sponges are plentiful the fish is normally well fed. It covers sponge pieces in thick mucous to help digestion.

Denominations in numerals are in three corners, in words in top left corner.

Comments:

The signature on banknote belongs to:

Sir William C. Allen, KCMGSir William C. Allen, KCMG.

Governor (June 1980 - January 1987) Sir William Allen joined The Bahamas Monetary Authority as Manager of Research in 1970. He was named Deputy Governor of the Central Bank, successor to the Authority, in 1974. He became Governor on 1st June, 1980 on the resignation of Mr. Timothy Baswell Donaldson from the post. Following an extensive

career in banking and finance, Sir Allen went on to serve in the Government of The Bahamas as Minister of State in the Ministry of Finance and Planning and subsequently as Minister of Finance and Planning. In 2000, Sir Allen was made a Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of St. Michael and George (KCMG).

In 1919 was created the Monetary Council (Currency Board). In 1968 was established the Office of Bahamas Monetary Authority, obtained the right of money issue. At June 1, 1974 were established the Central Bank of the Bahamas, which were transferred to the functions of the abolished Office of Bahamas Monetary Authority.