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1 Dollar 1964, Trinidad and Tobago

in Krause book Number: 26а
Years of issue: 1964 - 1966
Edition: 14 163 393
Signatures: Governor: Mr. John Pierce (1964 to 1966)
Serie: 1964 Central Bank Act
Specimen of: 1964
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 155 x 66
Printer: Bradbury, Wilkinson & Company Limited, New Malden

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

1 Dollar 1964

Description

Watermark:

watermark

The greater bird-of-paradise (Paradisaea apoda) is a bird-of-paradise in the genus Paradisaea.

Carolus Linnaeus named the species Paradisaea apoda, or "legless bird-of-paradise", because early trade-skins to reach Europe were prepared without feet by natives; this led to the misconception that these birds were beautiful visitors from paradise that were kept aloft by their plumes and never touched the earth until death.

In 1909 Sir William Ingram introduced the Greater Bird of Paradise, Paradisaea apoda to the island in an attempt to save the species from overhunting for the plume trade in its native New Guinea. About 45 juvenile birds were introduced to the island. After Ingram's death in 1924 his heirs deeded the island to the Government of Trinidad and Tobago as a wildlife sanctuary. The birds survived on the island until at least 1958 when they were filmed by a National Geographic crew. There are no reliable records after 1963 when Hurricane Flora hit the island and the population is presumed to be extinct.

Avers:

1 Dollar 1964

HM The Queen

This widely used portrait of the Queen is adapted from a painting by Pietro Annigoni. HM standing regally with a distant, but lonely aspect. The portrait is regarded by many as one of the finest portrayals of the young Queen.

It was privately commissioned by the „Worshipful Company of Fishmongers” in 1954, but not completed until 1956. The Queen displayed in white portrait room at Buckingham Palace. The painting is now displayed in Fishmongers Hall, in London.

The engraving on banknote made from this portrait.

HM depicted in Mantle of the Order of the Garter.

One of the most distinctive pieces of the wardrobe of the Most Noble Order of the Garter - England's highest chivalric order - is the Mantle, sometimes referred to as a robe, cloak, or cape. The Mantle has been used in one form or another, with varying fabrics and colors, since the 15th century. The current version is made of dark blue velvet lined with white taffeta and is accented by a red velvet hood (also lined with white taffeta), elaborate cords for closure, and white ribbons at the shoulders. The Garter Collar, with the Great George as a pendant (not visible in the portrait), is draped over the Mantle across the shoulders. (Her Majesty’s Jewel vault)

Order of the Garter

Various legends account for the origin of the Order. The most popular legend involves the "Countess of Salisbury" (either Edward's future daughter-in-law Joan of Kent or her former mother-in-law, Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury). While she was dancing at a court ball at Calais, her garter is said to have slipped from her leg. When the surrounding courtiers sniggered, the king picked it up and returned it to her, exclaiming: "Honi soit qui mal y pense," ("Shamed be the person who thinks evil of it."), the phrase that has become the motto of the Order.

A representation of a blue garter adorned with the motto of the Order of the Garter (Honi soit qui mal y pense, "Shame on he who thinks ill of it") can be seen on various items worn by members of the Order, but a far more rare sight today is the actual Garter that comes along with the rest of the insignia. The Garter is made of a blue fabric embellished with the Order's motto and closed with a buckle. The materials and design can vary (blue velvet and diamonds or blue silk and gold, for example). (Her Majesty’s Jewel vault)

Queen Alexandra’s Cluster Earrings

She is also wearing Queen Alexandra’s Cluster Earrings. The wedding gift from the future King Edward VII to his bride, Alexandra of Denmark. Also known as Queen Alexandra's Cluster Earrings, these two button earrings have large pearls surrounded by diamonds - 10 larger stones each plus smaller filler stones to create a full diamond ring. Like the brooch, these passed to the Queen via Queen Mary. They're now worn primarily at evening functions.

More about this portrait you can read in the description 1 dollar 1965.

coat of arms trinidad and Tobago

On the left side is the coat of arms of Trinidad and Tobago.

The coat of arms of Trinidad and Tobago was designed by a committee formed in 1962 to select the symbols that would be representative of the people of Trinidad and Tobago. The committee included noted artist Carlisle Chang and the late designer George Bailey.

The palm tree crest at the top of the coat of arms was taken from Tobago’s coat of arms before it was joined in political union with Trinidad. The wreath represents the crown of the monarchy of the United Kingdom, Trinidad and Tobago’s colonizers at the time of independence. The shield has the same colours (black, red, and white) as the nation’s flag and they carry the same meaning. The gold ships represent the Santa María, La Niña, and La Pinta: the three ships Christopher Columbus used on his journey to the “New World”. The two birds on the shield are hummingbirds. Trinidad is sometimes referred to as the “Land of the Hummingbird” because more than sixteen different species of hummingbird have been recorded on the island.

“Land of the Hummingbird” is also believed to have been the Native American name for Trinidad. The two larger birds are the Scarlet Ibis (left) and the Cocrico (right), the national birds of Trinidad and Tobago. Below the Scarlet Ibis are three hills, representing the Trinity Hills in southern Trinidad, which, it is believed, convinced Columbus to name the island after the Holy Trinity. The island rising out of the waters beneath the Cocrico represents Tobago. Below these birds is the nation’s motto, "Together We Aspire, Together We Achieve".

Denominations in numerals are in all corners, in words lower centered.

Revers:

1 Dollar 1964

Trinidad TrinidadThe Treasury Building in 1964 (Central bank of Trinidad and Tobago building from 1966).

This original Treasury Building was constructed by Governor, Sir Lewis Grant, in 1831. This building housed the "Treasury and Government Rum Bond" and became historic, not only because Sir Lweis Grant lived here, making it a Government House, but also, because it was from here that the succeeding governor, Sir George Fitzgerald Hill, declared the abolition of slavery on August 1, 1838.

On August 1, 1834, thousands of slaves stormed into Port of Spain and gathered in front of the site to protest being given “apprentice” status, rather than freedom from slavery. Known as Government House - which occupied the upper floor - the building was home to the old Treasury and Rum Bond. Four years later, in 1838, at this same location, the Emancipation Proclamation, announcing the beginning of the end of slavery, was read. In 1966 the building became the first home of the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago. In 1985, crowds once again returned to the front of the Treasury building on August 1, but this time to commemorate Emancipation Day, as a national holiday.

On June 25th, 1932 the original Treasury Building was destroyed by fire. The new Treasury Building was designed by British Architect, Hubert Brinsley, and its foundation stone was laid in 1936. Construction of the building was completed in 1938. In the past, agencies such as the General Post Office, Central Bank and Auditor General's Department shared the premises with the Treasury Division of Ministry of Finance.

However, since 1986, it has been solely occupied by the Treasury Division.

In top right corner is the Oil platform in the Caribbean. In the area of ​​Trinidad and Tobago producing oil.

Denominations in numerals are in three corners.

Comments:

TDLR Portrait Bradbury Wilkinson Portrait De La Rue version of the portrait. In this version, the darker shading on the side of The Queen's face below her temple has a distinct edge, highlighting her cheekbone. In addition, the braid on her cloak is drawn more simply and regularly.

Bradbury Wilkinson version of the portrait. The distinguishing features of this portrait are the even shading on side of The Queen's face, below her temple, and the distinct highlights given to the braid on the front of Her cloak, which originates from the bow on Her left shoulder.