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10 Shillings 1961, Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland

in Krause book Number: 20b
Years of issue: 23.01.1961
Edition: --
Signatures: Governor: Mr. B.C.J. Richards
Serie: Sterling area
Specimen of: 03.04.1956
Material: 100% raw cotton
Size (mm): 133 х 75
Printer: Bradbury, Wilkinson & Company Limited, New Malden

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** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

10 Shillings 1961

Description

Watermark:

watermark

The Rt. Hon. Cecil John Rhodes DCL (5 July 1853 - 26 March 1902) was a British businessman, mining magnate, and politician in South Africa. Rhodes was named the chairman of De Beers at the company's founding in 1888. De Beers, established with funding from NM Rothschild & Sons Limited in 1887, today markets 40% of the world's rough diamonds, and at one time marketed 90%. An ardent believer in British colonialism, Rhodes was the founder of the southern African territory of Rhodesia, which was named after him in 1895. South Africa's Rhodes University is also named after Rhodes. He set up the provisions of the Rhodes Scholarship, which is funded by his estate.

Avers:

10 Shillings 1961

Photo by Dorothy Wilding, 26 February 1952, HM The Queen Elizabeth II

HM The Queen Elizabeth II.

The first official photographic sitting with the new Queen was granted to the society photographer Dorothy Wilding. It took place on 26 February 1952, just twenty days after the accession. A total of fifty-nine photographs were taken by Wilding, showing The Queen dressed in a variety of gowns designed by Norman Hartnell and wearing jewellery including the Diamond Diadem. The photographs taken during this sitting were the basis of The Queen’s image on postage stamps from 1953 until 1971, as well as providing the official portrait of The Queen which was sent to every British embassy throughout the world. (Royal collection trust)

Diadem

The Queen is wearing the George IV State Diadem. Made by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell (and likely designed by their designer, Philip Liebart) in 1820, the diadem features a set of 4 crosses pattée alternating with 4 bouquets of roses, thistles, and shamrocks. The motifs are set on a band of diamond scrollwork between two bands of pearls. Queen Alexandra had the diadem made smaller in 1902, reducing the top band of pearls from 86 to 81, and the bottom band from 94 to 88. The front cross is set with a 4 carat yellow diamond, and the piece features 1,333 diamonds in all. (Sartorial Splendor)

Necklace present from Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar

The necklace worn by The Queen, of diamond flowers and leaves, was a wedding present from Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar. The necklace was originally crafted in 1930s by Cartier. It was a wedding gift to Queen Elizabeth II, who was still a princess, on her wedding to Prince Philip from the Last Nizam of Hyderabad, Mir Osman Ali Khan in 1947. The Nizam of Hyderabad asked the Queen to choose two pieces from Cartier to mark her wedding, and she chose a tiara and a matching necklace based on an English rose.

The necklace was made by Cartier with 38 diamonds, with a diamond-encrusted snap. It has a detachable double-drop pendant, made of 13 emerald-cut diamonds and a pear-shaped drop, forms the pave-set center of the necklace. The design was based on English roses.

Pair of pearl drop earrings, circa 1947

Pair of pearl drop earrings, made circa 1947.

The pearls used to create these earrings were a wedding present to Princess Elizabeth in 1947 from the Sheikh of Bahrain. The diamonds used in the earrings use a variety of modern cuts. (A Royal Wedding 1947)

This variety of the portrait is distinguished by the heavy shading on Her Majesty's right cheek and the tilt of the head. (Peter Symes)

The coat of arms of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland

Coat of arms on the top.

The coat of arms of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland was designed by M.J. Morris (later Information Attaché to the Federal High Commission in Pretoria, South Africa) and was granted by Royal Warrant on 22 July 1954.

The coat of arms had elements to represent all three territories which comprised the Federation: the rising sun on a blue field in the upper shield and leopard were taken from the arms of Nyasaland; the white wavy lines on a black field at the base of the shield and the eagle are from the arms of Northern Rhodesia; while the dovetail fesse (which links the component parts of the shield), bearing the lion passant, and the sable antelope supporter are from the arms of Southern Rhodesia.

The following is the heraldic description of the state arms of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland:

Crest: On a wreath of the colours, an Eagle reguardant wings extended Or perched upon and grasping in the talons a Fish Argent.

Supporters: Dexter a sable antelope and sinister a leopard.

Motto (in Latin): Magni Esse Mereamur (Let us deserve Greatness)

Shield: Per fesse Azure and Sable in Chief a Sun rising Or and in base six Palets wavy Argent over all a fesse dovetailed counter-dovetailed of the last thereon a Lion passant Gules.

Haliaeetus vociferIn lower left corner is The African Fish Eagle with fish.

The African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) or the African Sea Eagle is a large species of eagle that is found throughout sub-Saharan Africa wherever large bodies of open water occur that have an abundant food supply. It is the national bird of Zimbabwe, Zambia and South Sudan.

Denominations in numerals are in three corners, in words centered.

Revers:

10 Shillings 1961

ZambeziThe scene on the river. Most likely on Zambezi river.

The Zambezi (also spelled Zambeze and Zambesi) is the fourth-longest river in Africa, and the largest flowing into the Indian Ocean from Africa. The area of its basin is 1,390,000 square kilometers (540,000 sq mi.), slightly less than half that of the Nile. The 2,574 kilometers long river (1,599 mi.) rises in Zambia and flows through eastern Angola, along the eastern border of Namibia and the northern border of Botswana, then along the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe to Mozambique, where it crosses that country to empty into the Indian Ocean.

The Zambezi's most noted feature is Victoria Falls. Other notable falls include the Chavuma Falls at the border between Zambia and Angola, and Ngonye Falls, near Sioma in Western Zambia.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners, in words lower, centered.

Comments:

The pound was the currency of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. It was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence.

The Federation was formed in 1953, and the new currency was created in 1955 to replace the Southern Rhodesian pound which had been circulating in all parts of the federation (Southern Rhodesia, Northern Rhodesia, and Nyasaland). The Rhodesia and Nyasaland pound replaced the Southern Rhodesian pound at par and was pegged at par to the British pound.

The Federation broke up at the end of 1963 and the three territories reverted to being separate British colonies. In the second half of 1964, Nyasaland became independent as Malawi, Northern Rhodesia became independent as Zambia, and Southern Rhodesia declared a name change to Rhodesia. Each issued their own pounds, at par with the Rhodesia and Nyasaland pound. See Malawian pound, Zambian pound and Rhodesian pound.