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2,5 Gulden 1970, Netherlands Antilles

in Krause book Number: 21
Years of issue: 08.09.1970
Edition: 1 130 000
Signatures: Minister of Finance Mr. F.J. Tromp
Serie: Series 1970 - 1980
Specimen of: 08.09.1970
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 154 x 65
Printer: Joh. Enschede en Zonen, Haarlem

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

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2,5 Gulden 1970

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2,5 Gulden 1970

ALMThe plane of "ALM Dutch Antillean Airlines" - McDonnell Douglas DC-9-15 - in the flight.

The McDonnell Douglas DC-9 (initially known as the Douglas DC-9) is a twin-engine, single-aisle jet airliner. It was first manufactured in 1965 with its maiden flight later that year. The DC-9 was designed for frequent, short flights. The final DC-9 was delivered in October 1982.

During the 1950s Douglas Aircraft studied a short- to medium-range airliner to complement their higher capacity, long range DC-8. (DC stands for Douglas Commercial.) A medium-range four-engine Model 2067 was studied but it did not receive enough interest from airlines and it was abandoned. In 1960, Douglas signed a two-year contract with Sud Aviation for technical cooperation. Douglas would market and support the Sud Aviation Caravelle and produce a licensed version if airlines ordered large numbers. None were ordered and Douglas returned to its design studies after the cooperation deal expired.

In 1962, design studies were underway. The first version seated 63 passengers and had a gross weight of 69,000 lb (31,300 kg). This design was changed into what would be initial DC-9 variant. Douglas gave approval to produce the DC-9 on April 8, 1963. Unlike the competing but larger Boeing 727 trijet, which used as many 707 components as possible, the DC-9 was an all-new design. The DC-9 has two rear-mounted Pratt & Whitney JT8D turbofan engines, relatively small, efficient wings, and a T-tail. The DC-9's takeoff weight was limited to 80,000 lb (36,300 kg) for a two-person flight crew by Federal Aviation Agency regulations at the time. DC-9 aircraft have five seats across for economy seating. The airplane seats 80 to 135 passengers depending on version and seating arrangement.

The DC-9 was designed for short to medium routes, often to smaller airports with shorter runways and less ground infrastructure than the major airports being served by larger designs like the Boeing 707 and Douglas DC-8. Accessibility and short field characteristics were called for. Turnarounds were simplified by built-in airstairs, including one in the tail, which shortened boarding and deplaning times.

The tail-mounted engine design facilitated a clean wing without engine pods, which had numerous advantages. For example, flaps could be longer, unimpeded by pods on the leading edge and engine blast concerns on the trailing edge. This simplified design improved airflow at low speeds and enabled lower takeoff and approach speeds, thus lowering field length requirements and keeping wing structure light. The second advantage of the tail-mounted engines was the reduction in foreign object damage from ingested debris from runways and aprons. With this position, the engines could ingest ice streaming off the wing roots. Third, the absence of engines in underslung pods allowed a reduction in ground clearance, making the aircraft more accessible to baggage handlers and passengers. Finally, the mounting of the engine to the fuselage reduced the propulsion system's number of potential critical failure points: In a wing-mounted engine configuration, the engine can become detached from the wing or the wing can become detached from the fuselage, whereas the sole concern under a fuselage-mounted configuration is the potential for the engine to become detached from the fuselage.

The first DC-9, a production model, flew on February 25, 1965. The second DC-9 flew a few weeks later, with a test fleet of five aircraft flying by July. This allowed the initial Series 10 to gain airworthiness certification on November 23, 1965, and to enter service with Delta Air Lines on December 8. The DC-9 was always intended to be available in multiple versions to suit customer requirements, The first stretched version, the Series 30, with a longer fuselage and extended wing tips, flew on August 1, 1966, entering service with Eastern Air Lines in 1967. The initial Series 10 would be followed by the improved -20, -30, and -40 variants. The final DC-9 series was the -50, which first flew in 1974.

The DC-9 was a commercial success with 976 built when production ended in 1982. The DC-9 is one of the longest-lasting aircraft in operation. Its reliability and efficiency led to sales of its successors into the XXI century.

The DC-9 family is one of the most successful jet airliners with a total of over 2,400 units produced; it ranks third behind the second-place Airbus A320 family with over 6,000 produced, and the first-place Boeing 737 with over 8,000 produced.

Studies aimed at further improving DC-9 fuel efficiency, by means of retrofitted wingtips of various types, were undertaken by McDonnell Douglas. However, these did not demonstrate significant benefits, especially with existing fleets shrinking. The wing design makes retrofitting difficult.

Denominations are on the right side and in all corners.

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2,5 Gulden 1970

Coat of arms is centered.

coat

The coat of arms of the Netherlands Antilles consisted of a shield, a crown and the motto. The shield itself showed five blue stars on a golden background, within a red border. These five stars stood for the five islands of the Netherlands Antilles and also were represented in the flag. The crown atop the shield was that of the Dutch sovereign. Under the shield was a ribbon with the motto "Libertate Unanimus" ("United in Freedom"). The ultimate coat of arms was adopted on 1 January 1986, the day that Aruba separated from the Netherlands Antilles and acquired a status "aparte" within the Kingdom of the Netherlands. This coat of arms replaced the previous version, which had been in use since 23 October 1964 and contained six stars: again one for each island including Aruba.

Denominations are in top right and lower left corners, large one centered.

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Interesting fact:

Curacao - the main and the largest island the Lesser Antilles. According to one legend, on the way to the coast of South America, Spanish explorer Alonso de Ojeda left on the island some sailors suffering from scurvy, but they miraculously healed, and he named the island as Curacao (from the word "cure" - healing).