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10 Liri 1973, Malta

in Krause book Number: 33a
Years of issue: 15.01.1973 - 30.03.1979
Edition: --
Signatures: Mr. Henry C. de Gabriele, Mr. Alfred Camilleri
Serie: Second Issue
Specimen of: 15.01.1973
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 152 х 80
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

10 Liri 1973

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Malta's female allegory - Melita.

Avers:

10 Liri 1973

Map of Malta is centered.

On the right side is the coat of arms of Bank of Malta "FIDUCIA FORTIS 1968".

coat

Heraldry is essentially a system of recognition by hereditary devices developed among the knights of mediaeval Christendom. The majority of the symbols employed in heraldry have their own technical terms with French and Latin used principally in the description.

The establishment of the Armorial Bearings and Supporters of the Central Bank of Malta was a lengthy process involving registration in the official records of the College of Arms in the United Kingdom. By authority delegated to them by the Sovereign since the fifteenth century, three officers of the College, that is, the Kings of Arms, grant arms in a document called Letters Patent.

The Armorial Bearings of the Bank were duly established by Letters Patent. A formal application, known as a Memorial, was lodged in 1969 with the Earl Marshal, the Duke of Norfolk, at the College of Arms. This was done through the Windsor Herald of Arms, acting on behalf of the Bank. This Memorial gave details of the Bank's constitution, its history and the law under which it was set up. Evidence of this was provided by the Central Bank of Malta Act 1967 and the Bank's Bye-Laws.

Once the Memorial had been submitted and agreement reached regarding the design, the Letters Patent were prepared on a large piece of vellum, or fine parchment, on which were shown the Royal Arms, the Arms of the College of Arms, and those of the Earl Marshal. The text of the Patent was hand engrossed, and contains a formal description of the Bank's Arms illuminated by hand. The document is officially signed and sealed by the King of Arms.

A preliminary sketch for the Armorial Bearings of the Bank was made by the well-known Maltese artist, Chevalier Emvin Cremona. The College suggested certain re-arrangements of the original design, and on the basis of these exchanges a final version was prepared and sent to the United Kingdom. It contained, in Latin, the motto, "Fiducia Fortis" - "In Confidence Strength" and "1968", the date of the Bank's foundation.

In designing the Armorial Bearings, the artist sought to capture an element which was not only original but also expressive of the spirit of Malta. The Bank's arms incorporate items then found in the official arms of Malta. These include the mural crown surmounting the crest - symbolic of Malta's historic role as a fortress; the Maltese national colours, red and white, on the shield; the George Cross, awarded to Malta for bravery in April 1942 by King George VI, and reproduced on the Bank's shield by authority of the Prime Minister of Malta; the dolphin on the head of the key, a fish known in classical Mediterranean literature and often appearing as a prime heraldic figure; and the laurel and palm branches, symbols of honour and peace, respectively, supporting the mural crown. The horizontal key on the shield is appropriate to the Armorial Bearings of the Bank, the governing financial institution in Malta and a key to economic progress and security.

The two supporting Knights of Malta are a unique feature. The granting of supporters to Armorial Bearings is a privilege allowed only to major institutions. In the Bank's case they have a very special significance. The Knights represent confidence and strength, the two virtues which are incorporated in the Bank's motto. They also symbolise some of the greatest pages in the Country's long military history, when for more than two-and-a-half centuries Malta was ruled by the Order of the Knights of St John of Jerusalem. The plumed helmet of a knight which surmounts the shield also has a special connection with Malta. It is modelled on one found on a monument in the sixteenth-century Co-Cathedral of St John in Valletta, built by the Knights.

The official copy of the Bank's Armorial Bearings contains colours reflecting Malta's historic past. The Knights on either side of the shield are of a steely blue colour. The feathers composing the plume on each helm on the Knights' heads are in red and white, while the blades, quillons and the pommel of the two-handed swords, together with the cords and tassels hanging from them are in gold. This is also the colour of the mural crown above the crest.

A black and white design of the Armorial Bearings was first used in the Bank's Annual Report for 1970. A library painting of the final version of the Armorial Bearings and Supporters was displayed at the official inauguration of the Bank on 13 February 1971. An embossed fiber-glass version in colour now hangs in the Bank's Board Room.

On the right side is The Air Force War Memorial.

Floriana War Memorial

The Air Force War Memorial is located in the Valletta City, gate area in Floriana, close to the Triton Fountain and main bus terminus. It is a memorial to 600 Maltese and nearly one million British servicemen that gave their lives during the Great War of 1914-1918. Nearby is the Malta Memorial.

The War Memorial was designed by Louis Naudi and unveiled in 1938 by the governor of Malta. It is constructed of Gozo stone and is in the form of five crosses. After World War Two, the memorial was updated so as to represent the fallen from both wars. The dedication plaques were replaced with tributes from world leaders of the time.

On the left side is the statue of Neptune in the Neptune Courtyard of the Grand Master's Palace, Valletta.

Neptune statue

The Grand Masters Palace is located in St. George's Square, along Republic Street on which are two main gates: one leading to Neptune's Courtyard and the other to Prince Alfred's Courtyard. This second entrance was added to the existing structure during the reign of Grand Master Pinto.

The Palace served as a residential building for the Grand Masters of the Order for 225 years and from 1800 to 1964, it was the residence of the British Governors. After Malta obtained its independence from Britain in 1964, it became the official residence of the Governor General until 1974. Thereafter, it housed the office of the President of the Republic of Malta.

The bronze life-size sculpture of Neptune, the Roman god of the Sea has been guarding the courtyard named after him since 1861. Despite his stark nudity, Neptune stands majestically and unashamedly, holding a trident in his right hand against a backdrop of a fountain bearing the coat of arms of Grand Master Perellos. This is is a creation by the Flemish artist Jean Boulogne better known by his alias, Giambologna. The sculpture used to stand in the center of a fountain at the old fish market close to the Our Lady of Liesse Church. In 1612, the Grand Master Alof de Wignacourt decorated by statue the fountain in the old fish market to celebrate the completion of the Wignacourt aqueduct, that brought water to the new capital. This original statue was later removed to Neptune Courtyard, after the fountain was dismantled.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In center in words.

Revers:

10 Liri 1973

Il Port il Kbir

Grand Harbour (Il-Port il-Kbir) is a natural harbour on the island of Malta. It has been used as a harbour since at least Phoenician times. The natural harbour has been greatly improved with extensive docks and wharves, and has been massively fortified.

The harbour mouth faces north east and is bounded to the north by St Elmo's Point and further sheltered by an isolated breakwater and is bounded to the south by Ricasoli Point. Its north west shore is formed by the Scebarras peninsula, which is largely covered by the city of Valletta and its suburb Floriana. This peninsula also divides Grand Harbour from a second parallel natural harbour, Marsamxett Harbour. The main waterway of Grand Harbour continues inland almost to Marsa. The south eastern shore of the harbour is formed by a number of inlets and headlands, principally Rinella Creek, Kalkara Creek, Dockyard Creek, and French Creek, which are covered by Kalkara and the Three Cities: Cospicua, Vittoriosa, and Senglea.

With its partner harbour of Marsamxett, Grand Harbour lies at the centre of gently rising ground. Development has grown up all around the twin harbours and up the slopes so that the whole bowl is effectively one large conurbation. Much of Malta's population lives within a three kilometer radius of Floriana. This is now one of the most densely populated areas in Europe.

The Grand Harbour was the base for the Knights of St John for 268 years, and after their departure became a strategic base for the British for a further 170 years. It was the site in the late 16th century of a devastating tornado that killed 600 people and destroyed a shipping armada. The area was the scene of much of the fighting in the First Siege of Malta when the Turks attempted to eject the Knights of St John. The whole area was savagely bombed during the Second Siege of Malta during World War II, as the docks and military installations around the port were legitimate targets for Axis bombers. However collateral damage wrecked much of Valletta and The Three Cities, and caused large numbers of civilian casualties.

Malta Dockyard is still active, but with the departure of the British Military the harbour lost much of its military significance. A considerable part of Malta's commercial shipping is now handled by the new free port at Kalafrana, so the harbour is much quieter than it was in the first half of the XX century.

Dgħajsa

A dgħajsa (dysa) is a traditional water taxi from Malta. The design of the Dghajsa, like that of another Maltese boat, the luzzu, is believed to date back at least to the Phoenician times.

It was mainly used in the area of the Grand Harbour, to carry passengers and small baggage from ships to shore. It was usually propelled by one man standing, facing forward, and pushing on two oars. The high stem and stern pieces seem to be mainly ornamental but they are useful in handling the boat and in the boarding and disembarking of passengers. The decorative symbols vary from boat to boat.

Nowadays Dghajjes are no longer used as water taxis but as tourist attractions. They are sometimes motorised with diesel engines.

The Dghajsa is one of the symbols of Malta and it appeared on the coat of arms of Malta from 1975 to 1988.

Denominations in numerals are in top corners. Lower left in words.

Comments:

The Central Bank issued its second series, the CBM 2nd series, on 15 January 1973. The 10/- note was dropped (a 50c coin had been issued in May 1972 as part of the coin changeover to decimalization) and a £M10 note was introduced.