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1 Dollar 1954. Devils face, Canada

in Krause book Number: 74, 75
Years of issue: 1954 - 1956
Edition: 21000
Signatures: Deputy Governor: Mr. J.R. Beattie, Governor: Mr. James E. Coyne
Serie: 1954 Issue
Specimen of: 09.09.1954
Material: 50% high grade flax, 50% cotton
Size (mm): 152.4 х 69.85
Printer: British American Bank Note Co. Ltd., Montreal

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** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

1 Dollar 1954. Devils face

Description

Watermark:

Avers:

1 Dollar 1954. Devils face

Queen

HM The Queen Elizabeth II.

This portrait of Queen Elizabeth is based on a photograph by Canadian photographer Yousuf Karsh. The photograph was one of many taken during a photographic session in 1951 in Clarence House, a year before Queen Elizabeth's accession to the throne.

It was made for Princess Elizabeth's Tour of Canada and the United States.

Many of the portraits from the photographic session show The Queen wearing a tiara, but the particular photograph chosen by the Bank of Canada for its 1954 issue is one without the tiara.

The tiara was removed to distinguish the portrait from another, based on the same photo, which had recently been featured on a Canadian stamp.

Princess Elizabeth is wearing a Norman Hartnell gown. The necklace worn by The Queen in this portrait, of diamond flowers and leaves, was a wedding present from Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar and Queen Mary's Floret Earrings.

The image on the banknotes, which is based on Karsh's photograph, was engraved by George Gundersen of the British American Bank Note Company. This portrait is famous for its two varieties.

1)The first variety of this engraving incorporates a 'devil's head' in The Queen's hair.

2)The second variety of the engraving is modified to remove the offending pattern in Her Majesty's hair.

coat canadaThe Canadian coat of arms is on background.

The Arms of Canada, also known as the Royal Coat of Arms of Canada or formally as the Arms of Her Majesty The Queen in Right of Canada is, since 1921, the official coat of arms of the Canadian monarch and thus also of Canada. It is closely modeled after the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom with distinctive Canadian elements replacing or added to those derived from the British.

The maple leaves in the shield, blazoned "proper", were originally drawn vert (green) but were redrawn gules (red) in 1957 and a circlet of the Order of Canada was added to the arms for limited use in 1987. The shield design forms the monarch's royal standard and is also found on the Canadian Red Ensign. The Flag of the Governor General of Canada, which formerly used the shield over the Union Flag, now uses the crest of the arms on a blue field.

Denominations in numerals are centered and in top corners. In words in lower corners and centered (also on the right and left sides).

Revers:

1 Dollar 1954. Devils face

Engraver: Carl Louis Irmscher of the "American Bank Note Company".

Saskatchewan

Prairies of Saskatchewan, overcast sky.

The Canadian Prairies is a region in western Canada, which may correspond to several different definitions, natural or political. Notably, the Prairie provinces or simply the Prairies comprise the provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, as they are partially covered by prairie (grasslands). In a more restricted sense, the term may also refer only to the areas of those provinces covered by prairie.

While the Prairies now have their share of big cities, rural living remains an important component of the region’s identity. At a time when more and more Canadians live exclusively in downtown apartments and make money in XXI century, post-industrial jobs, the Prairies is a place where farming and mining still generate a livelihood for many, and conservative-minded folk live in small, pioneer communities separated by vast fields and open skies. (www.thecanadaguide.com)

Denominations in numerals are in all corners, in words on the right and left sides and at the top.

Comments:

This note has not modified portrait! Devil's face!

Banknotes Series 1954.