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10 Rupees 1959, Indonesia

in Krause book Number: 66
Years of issue: 02.01.1960 - 31.12.1966
Edition: --
Signatures: Gubernur: Mr, Loekman Hakim , Direktur: Mr. TRB. Sabaroedin
Serie: Flower Series 1959
Specimen of: 01.01.1959
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 134 x 68
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

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** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

10 Rupees 1959

Description

Watermark:

watermark

The National emblem of Indonesia is called Garuda Pancasila. The main part of Indonesian national emblem is the Garuda with a heraldic shield on its chest and a scroll gripped by its legs. The shield's five emblems represent Pancasila, the five principles of Indonesia's national ideology. The Garuda claws gripping a white ribbon scroll inscribed with the national motto Bhinneka Tunggal Ika written in black text, which can be loosely translated as "Unity in Diversity". Garuda Pancasila was designed by Sultan Hamid II from Pontianak, supervised by Sukarno, and was adopted as the national emblem on 11 February 1950.

Avers:

10 Rupees 1959

HoyaHoya vitellina - mostly grows on Java island.

Hoya is an Asclepiad genus of 200-300 species of tropical plants in the family Apocynaceae (Dogbane). Most are native to Asia including India, China, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia, There is a great diversity of species in the Philippines, and species in Polynesia, New Guinea, and Australia.

Common names for this genus are waxplant, waxvine, waxflower or simply Hoya. This genus was named by botanist Robert Brown, in honour of his friend, botanist Thomas Hoy.

Denominations in numerals are in top corners. Centered in words.

Revers:

10 Rupees 1959

there are 2 opinions about Cockatoos on this banknote.

First Opinion:

Cacatua moluccensis Cacatua moluccensisThe Salmon-crested cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) also known as the Moluccan cockatoo, is a cockatoo endemic to the south Moluccas in eastern Indonesia. At a height of up to 46-52 cm. and weight of up to 850 g, it is among the largest of the white cockatoos. The female is larger than the male on average. It has white-pink feathers with a definite peachy glow, a slight yellow on the under-wing and underside of the tail feathers and a large retractable recumbent crest which it raises when threatened, revealing hitherto concealed bright red-orange plumes to frighten potential attackers. It may also be raised in excitement or in other "emotional" displays. Some describe the crest as "flamingo-colored." It also has one of the louder calls in the parrot world and in captivity is a capable mimic.

In the wild the salmon-crested cockatoo inhabits lowland forests below 1000 m. The diet consists mainly of seeds, nuts and fruit, as well as coconuts. There is additional evidence that they eat insects off the ground, and pet Moluccan cockatoos have tested positive for anemia if their diet does not include enough protein.

Second opinion:

JinggaThe Citron-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea citrinocristata) is a medium-sized cockatoo with an orange crest, dark grey beak, pale orange ear patches, and strong feet and claws. The underside of the larger wing and tail feathers have a pale yellow colour. The eye colour ranges from brown through very dark brown to black. Both sexes are similar. The smallest of the Yellow-crested Cockatoo subspecies, it is endemic to Sumba in the Lesser Sunda Islands in Indonesia. The diet consists mainly of seeds, buds, fruits, nuts and herbaceous plants.

The Sun is in center.

Denominations in numerals are in top corners .

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