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750 000 Dollars 2007, Zimbabwe

in Krause book Number: 52
Years of issue: 31.12.2007 (redemption date 30.06.2008)
Edition:
Signatures: Governor: Dr. G. Gono
Serie: 2006-2008 Bearer Cheques Emergency Issue
Specimen of: 31.12.2007
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 152 х 77
Printer: Fidelity Printers and Refinery, Msasa Industrial area, Harare

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

750 000 Dollars 2007

Description

Watermark:

Zimbabwe Bird Zimbabwe Bird

The stone-carved Zimbabwe Bird and 1000.

The stone-carved Zimbabwe Bird. It is the national emblem of Zimbabwe, appearing on the national flags and coats of arms of both Zimbabwe and Rhodesia, as well as on banknotes and coins (first on Rhodesian pound and then Rhodesian dollar). It probably represents the Bateleur eagle or the African Fish Eagle.

The original carved birds are from the ruined city of Great Zimbabwe, which was built by ancestors of the Shona, starting in the 11th century and continuing for over 300 years. The ruins, after which modern Zimbabwe was named, cover some 1,800 acres (7.3 km²) and are the largest ancient stone construction in Zimbabwe. Among its notable elements are the soapstone bird sculptures, about 16 inches tall and standing on columns more than a yard tall, were installed on walls and monoliths of the ancient city of Great Zimbabwe. They are believed to have been a sign of the royal presence.

After the ruins of Great Zimbabwe were discovered by European colonists in the late nineteenth century, they took five of the carved birds to the Cape Colony and sold them to its leader Cecil Rhodes. A German missionary came to own the pedestal of one bird, which he sold to the Ethnological Museum in Berlin in 1907. At the independence of Zimbabwe in 1981, the South African government returned four of the statues to the country; the fifth is held at Groote Schuur, Rhodes' former home in Cape Town. In 2003, the German museum returned the portion of bird's pedestal to Zimbabwe.

Avers:

750 000 Dollars 2007

balancing rocks

On the left side of the banknote - the logo of the Bank of Zimbabwe - balancing rocks.

The Balancing Rocks are geomorphological features of igneous rocks found in many parts of Zimbabwe, and are particularly noteworthy in Matopos National Park and near the township of Epworth to the southeast of Harare. The formations are of natural occurrence in a perfectly balanced state without other support. Their popularity grew when the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe featured the formations on the last series of Zimbabwean banknotes.

The Balancing Rocks have been used as a metaphorical theme to explain the importance of development coupled with preserving the fragile environment of Zimbabwe as similar to that of the Balancing Rocks found in Epworth, Matopos and in other areas.

Giraffa camelopardalis giraffe

There is a strip of foil on the banknote. On it are 2 giraffes. This is South African giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis giraffe), standing near small tree.

Found in northern South Africa, southern Botswana, southern Zimbabwe, and south-western Mozambique. It has dark, somewhat rounded patches "with some fine projections" on a tawny background color. The spots extend down the legs and get smaller. The median lump of males is less developed. A maximum of 12,000 are estimated to remain in the wild, and around 45 are kept in zoos.

Revers:

750 000 Dollars 2007

Loxodonta africana

Centered is an African bush elephant, coming out of bush (looks very wise). Symbolizes the protection of wildlife.

The African bush elephant (Loxodonta africana) is the larger of the two species of African elephant.

Both it and the African forest elephant have in the past been classified as a single species, known simply as the African elephant, but recent preliminary evidence has seen the forest elephant classified as a distinct species (although this status is not conclusively accepted due to concerns over conservation strategies until the reclassification is formalized).

Victoria Falls

Right of elephant are Victoria Falls.

Victoria Falls, or Mosi-oa-Tunya (Tokaleya Tonga: the Smoke that Thunders), is a waterfall in southern Africa on the Zambezi River at the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe (Rhodesia).

David Livingstone, the Scottish missionary and explorer, is believed to have been the first European to view Victoria Falls on 16 November 1855 from what is now known as Livingstone Island, one of two land masses in the middle of the river, immediately upstream from the falls on the Zambian side. Livingstone named his discovery in honour of Queen Victoria, but the indigenous name "Mosi-oa-Tunya" - "the smoke that thunders" - continues in common usage as well. The nearby national park in Zambia, for example, is named "Mosi-oa-Tunya", whereas the national park and town on the Zimbabwean shore are both named Victoria Falls. The World Heritage List officially recognizes both names.

Victoria - the only waterfall in the world, having more than 100 meters high and more than a kilometer wide.

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