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5000 Rupees 2001, Indonesia

in Krause book Number: 142a
Years of issue: 06.11.2001
Edition:
Signatures: Gubernur: Sjahril Sabirin (In office 1999 - 2003), Deputi Gubernur: Miranda S. Goeltom
Serie: 2009 Issue
Specimen of: 06.11.2001
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 143 x 65
Printer: Perum Percetakan Uang Republik Indonesia (PERURI), Kebayoran Baru, Jakarta

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

5000 Rupees 2001

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Cut Nyak Meutia, also known as Cut Meutia, (1870 - 24 October 1910) is an Indonesian national hero from Aceh.

Meutia was born in 1870 in Perlak, Aceh. When she grew into adulthood, she married Teuku Sam Searah. They divorced not long afterward.

Against the Dutch.

Cut Nyak Meutia's new husband was Cut Muhammad or Teuku Cik Tunong. Differing from his brother, Cut Muhammad did not obey the Dutch because he didn't accept their colonization of Aceh. Cut Muhammad and his wife worked hand in hand with the Acehnese to fight against the Dutch.

Cut Nyak Meutia

In 1899 Teuku Cik Tunong led a successful attack against the Dutch. In the beginning, the Dutch troops were at a loss as to what to do. In the following two years, however, Cik Tunong and his troops had not made any movements. The Dutch thought that they might have lost their spirit. Yet in 1901, Teuku Cik Tunong and his troops made a sudden attack and succeeded in destroying the Dutch defense there.

For his success, Teuku Cik Tunong was soon appointed District Chief of Keureutoe by the Sultan of Aceh. From 1901 to 1903 Teuku Cik Tunong had been the commander of some battles in the northeast of Aceh. There, he and his troops killed 10 of soldiers of the Dutch and seized 67 guns from them. Mubin and Pang Gadeng, two surrendered spies, had made Cut Nyak Meutia and her husband successful in the battles.

In 1905 Teuku Cik Tunong was caught by the Dutch and put in jail. He was shot dead by them in the same year.

The death of Teuku Cik Tunong had made Cut Nyak Meutia struggle with the new commander, Pang Nanggroe, who was her last husband. Pang Nanggroe was also killed in the battle on September 26, 1910. His death made Cut Nyak Meutia the new commander, with only 45 men and 13 guns left.

Cut Nyak Meutia was found by the Dutch in September 1910 at her hideaway in Paya Cicem. She resisted capture, wielding a rencong. She was killed after Dutch troops shot her in the head and chest.

She is now seen as a symbol of pride among Indonesian woman, along with other heroines such as Raden Ayu Kartini and Cut Nyak Dhien. On May 2, 1964 she was proclaimed a National Hero of Indonesia.

The woman on watermark is Cut Nyak Meutia, not Cut Nyak Dhien (Tjoet Nja' Dhien), despite unclear image on different years of issue of this banknotes.

The fact is that the Bank of Indonesia almost every year of issue of banknotes depicted a watermark with some changes. Initially, the woman on the watermark looked generally like a cartoon. The Bank explained this difference in the image by different suppliers of paper for banknotes, in the sense of its different color shade and so on. Therefore, many believed that the banknote depicted Cut Nyak Dhien, but this is still not the case. The image of Cut Nyak Meutia was originally taken from the image of the Indonesian stamp issued in 1969, which you see in my description.

Avers:

5000 Rupees 2001

Tuanku Imam Bonjol

Tuanku Imam Bonjol (1772 – 6 November 1864), also known as Muhammad Syahab, Peto Syarif, and Malim Basa, was one of the most popular leaders of the Padri movement in Central Sumatra. He was declared a National Hero of Indonesia.

Tuanku Imam Bonjol was born in Bonjol, Pasaman, West Sumatra. His family came from Sungai Rimbang, Suliki, Limapuluh Koto. His parents name were Bayanuddin (father) and Hamatun (mother). He was immersed in Islamic studies as he grew up, studying first from his father and later under various other Muslim theologians.

After founding the state of Bonjol, Syarif became involved in the Adat-Paderi controversy as a Paderi leader. The Paderi movement, which has been compared to the Ahlus Sunnah wal Jamaah (Sunni) school of Islam in the now Saudi Arabia, was an effort to return the Islam of the area to the purity of its roots by removing local distortions like gambling, cockfighting, the use of opium and strong drink, tobacco, and so forth. It also opposed the powerful role of women in the matrilineal Minangkabau culture. The Adat, or traditionalist, position was that local custom that pre-dated the arrival of Islam should also be respected and followed.

Feeling their leadership position threatened, the traditionalists appealed to the Dutch for help in their struggle against the Paderis. At first, the Dutch were not able to win militarily against the Paderis because their resources were stretched thin by the Diponegoro resistance in Java. In 1824, the Dutch signed the Masang Agreement ending hostilities with the state of Bonjol.

Subsequently, however, once the Diponegoro resistance was suppressed, the Dutch attacked the state of Pandai Sikat in a renewed effort to gain control of West Sumatra. Despite valiant fighting by the Indonesians (by this time the traditionalists had realised they didn't want to be ruled by the Dutch either and had joined forces with the Paderis in their resistance), the overwhelming power of the Dutch military eventually prevailed. Syarif was captured in 1832 but escaped after three months to continue the struggle from his tiny fortress in Bonjol.

After three years of siege, the Dutch finally managed to sack Bonjol on 16 August 1837. Through a negotiation ruse, the Dutch again captured Syarif and exiled him, first to Cianjur in West Java, then to Ambon, and later to Manado in Sulawesi. He died on 6 November 1864, at the age of 92 and is buried in Sulawesi. The site of his grave is marked by a Minangkabau (West Sumatran) house.

Top right is the National emblem of Indonesia.

garuda

It is called Garuda Pancasila. The main part of Indonesian national emblem is the Garuda with a heraldic shield on its chest and a scroll gripped by its legs. The shield's five emblems represent Pancasila, the five principles of Indonesia's national ideology. The Garuda claws gripping a white ribbon scroll inscribed with the national motto Bhinneka Tunggal Ika written in black text, which can be loosely translated as "Unity in Diversity". Garuda Pancasila was designed by Sultan Hamid II from Pontianak, supervised by Sukarno, and was adopted as the national emblem on 11 February 1950.

Denominations in numerals are in top left corner and on right side.

Revers:

5000 Rupees 2001

Songket

Songket weaver from Tanah Datar, West Sumatra.

Tanah Datar Regency is a regency (kabupaten) in West Sumatra province, Indonesia. The capital of the regency is Batusangkar. The town of Padang Panjang is also geographically located within the regency but constitutes a municipality (kota otonom) of its own.

Tanah Datar has several tourist attractions including the Pagaruyung Palace (Istano Pagaruyuang) with its museum, Sanskrit and Malay language stone inscriptions from the XIV century, several sites with megaliths (batu tagak), and the village Pandai Sikat (Pandai Sikek), where the traditional songket (kain balapak) is still woven. The northern part of Lake Singkarak is situated in Tanah Datar. The traditional bull race pacu jawi take place in the regency too.

Songket is a fabric that belongs to the brocade family of textiles of the Malay world (today, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore and Southern Thailand). It is hand-woven in silk or cotton, and intricately patterned with gold or silver threads. The metallic threads stand out against the background cloth to create a shimmering effect. In the weaving process the metallic threads are inserted in between the silk or cotton weft (latitudinal) threads in a technique called supplementary weft weaving technique.

Denominations in numerals are in left top and lower right corners. At the bottom in words.

Comments:

Many thanks to Sigit Adi Buwono from Jakarta (Indonesia) for these banknotes for my collection!