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50 Dollars 2000, Hong Kong

in Krause book Number: 202d
Years of issue: 01.01.2000
Edition: 14 018 896
Signatures: Unknown signature
Serie: No Serie
Specimen of: 01.01.1993
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 148 x 74
Printer: Hong Kong Note Printing Limited, Hong Kong

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

50 Dollars 2000

Description

Watermark:

watermark

The lion of "The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation".

Avers:

50 Dollars 2000

One of HSBC lions is on the left side.

On background is view at the city.

Denomination in numeral is in top right corner and in words centered.

Revers:

50 Dollars 2000

The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation lionTwo lions are lower, centered.

Various headquarters and branch buildings of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation and the HSBC Group, into which the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation has evolved, feature a pair of lion sculptures.

Cast by J W Singer & Sons in the English town of Frome, to a design by Henry Poole RA, these lions had quickly become part of the Shanghai scene, and passers-by would affectionately stroke the lions in the belief that power and money would rub off on them. They became known as Stephen and Stitt: an in-joke. Stephen was named for A G Stephen, formerly Manager Shanghai, and in 1923 the Chief Manager of HSBC, and G H Stitt, the then Manager Shanghai. Stephen is depicted roaring, Stitt quiescent, and again insiders said that this represented the characters of these two famous bankers.

They are seen as one of the key symbols of HSBC, so much so that HSBC is locally known in Hong Kong as "the Lion Bank".

The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation new buildingThe new bank building is in the middle. Designed by renowned British architect Lord Norman Foster.

HSBC Main Building is a headquarters building of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, which is today a wholly owned subsidiary of London based HSBC Holdings. It is located along the southern side of Statue Square near the location of the old City Hall, Hong Kong (built in 1869, demolished in 1933). The previous HSBC building was built in 1935 and pulled down to make way for the current building. The address remains as 1 Queen's Road Central. The building can be reached from Exit K of Central MTR Station and facing Statue Square.

The early British settlers in Hong Kong had an interest in Feng Shui; thus, most of the earliest buildings in Hong Kong, and many buildings constructed thereafter, were built with the philosophies of Feng Shui in mind. The Chinese believe that those who have a direct view of a body of water - whether it is a river, a sea, or an ocean-are more likely to prosper than those who do not (water is strongly associated with wealth in Feng Shui). The HSBC building has a wide open area (the Statue Square) in front of it, with no other buildings blocking its view of Victoria Harbour; thus, it is considered to have "good feng shui".

Dragon boat raceDragon boat race depicted on the right side.

A dragon boat is a human-powered watercraft. They were traditionally made in the Pearl River Delta region of China's southern Guangdong Province out of teak wood to various designs and sizes. In other parts of China different woods are used to build these traditional watercrafts. It is one of a family of Traditional Paddled Long Boats found throughout Asia, Africa, and the Pacific Islands. Currently, boats are being made, for competitive purposes, out of carbon fiber and other light materials. Dragon boats are the basis of the team paddling sport of dragon boat racing a watersport which has its roots in an ancient folk ritual of contending villagers held over the past 2000 years throughout southern China. While "competition" has taken place annually for more than 20 centuries as part of religious ceremonies and folk customs, dragon boat racing has emerged in modern times as an international sport, beginning in Hong Kong in 1976. For competition events, dragon boats are generally rigged with decorative Chinese dragon heads and tails. At other times such as training the decorative regalia is usually removed, although the drum often remains aboard for practice by drummers.

Denominations are in all corners.

Comments:

Special Administrative Region of China since 1997.