header Notes Collection
Top

10 Dollars 2009, Zimbabwe

in Krause book Number: 94a
Years of issue: 02.02.2009
Edition:
Signatures: Governor: Dr. G. Gono
Serie: 2009 Serie
Specimen of: 02.02.2009
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 148 х 74
Printer: Fidelity Printers and Refinery, Msasa Industrial area, Harare

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

10 Dollars 2009

Description

Watermark:

Avers:

10 Dollars 2009

balancing rocks

The Balancing Rocks are geomorphological features of igneous rocks found in many parts of Zimbabwe, and are particularly noteworthy in Matopos National Park and near the township of Epworth to the southeast of Harare. The formations are of natural occurrence in a perfectly balanced state without other support. Their popularity grew when the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe featured the formations on the last series of Zimbabwean banknotes.

The Balancing Rocks have been used as a metaphorical theme to explain the importance of development coupled with preserving the fragile environment of Zimbabwe as similar to that of the Balancing Rocks found in Epworth, Matopos and in other areas.

bird

In lower right corner is a profile of the stone-carved Zimbabwe Bird. It is the national emblem of Zimbabwe, appearing on the national flags and coats of arms of both Zimbabwe and Rhodesia, as well as on banknotes and coins (first on Rhodesian pound and then Rhodesian dollar). It probably represents the Bateleur eagle or the African Fish Eagle.

The original carved birds are from the ruined city of Great Zimbabwe, which was built by ancestors of the Shona, starting in the 11th century and continuing for over 300 years. The ruins, after which modern Zimbabwe was named, cover some 1,800 acres (7.3 km²) and are the largest ancient stone construction in Zimbabwe. Among its notable elements are the soapstone bird sculptures, about 16 inches tall and standing on columns more than a yard tall, were installed on walls and monoliths of the ancient city of Great Zimbabwe. They are believed to have been a sign of the royal presence.

After the ruins of Great Zimbabwe were discovered by European colonists in the late nineteenth century, they took five of the carved birds to the Cape Colony and sold them to its leader Cecil Rhodes. A German missionary came to own the pedestal of one bird, which he sold to the Ethnological Museum in Berlin in 1907. At the independence of Zimbabwe in 1981, the South African government returned four of the statues to the country; the fifth is held at Groote Schuur, Rhodes' former home in Cape Town. In 2003, the German museum returned the portion of bird's pedestal to Zimbabwe.

On background are stylized grains and livestock (cows, pigs).

Denominations in numerals are repeated 5 times, in words lover.

Revers:

10 Dollars 2009

great zimbabwe

Great Zimbabwe is a ruined city in the southeastern hills of Zimbabwe near Lake Mutirikwe and the town of Masvingo, close to the Chimanimani Mountains and the Chipinge District. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe during the country's Late Iron Age. Construction on the monument by ancestors of the Shona people began in the XI century and continued until the XIV century, spanning an area of 722 hectares (1,780 acres) which, at its peak, could have housed up to 18,000 people. It is recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

Great Zimbabwe

Great Zimbabwe served as a royal palace for the Zimbabwean monarch and would have been used as the seat of political power. One of its most prominent features were the walls, some of which were over five meters high and which were constructed without mortar. Eventually the city was abandoned and fell into ruin.

The earliest known written mention of the ruins was in 1531 by Vicente Pegado, captain of the Portuguese garrison of Sofala, who recorded it as Symbaoe. The first visits by Europeans were in the late XIX century, with investigations of the site starting in 1871. Later, studies of the monument were controversial in the archaeological world, with political pressure being put upon archaeologists by the government of Rhodesia to deny its construction by black people. Great Zimbabwe has since been adopted as a national monument by the Zimbabwean government, and the modern independent state was named for it. The word "Great" distinguishes the site from the many hundreds of small ruins, now known as "zimbabwes", spread across the Zimbabwe Highveld. There are 200 such sites in southern Africa, such as Bumbusi in Zimbabwe and Manyikeni in Mozambique, with monumental, mortarless walls; Great Zimbabwe is the largest.

On the background are stylized grains and livestock (cows).

Denominations in numerals are repeated 6 times.

Comments:

3 mm. iridescent stripe with repeating RBZ.