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500 Piso 2016, Philippines

in Krause book Number: 210
Years of issue: 2016
Edition:
Signatures: Pangulo NG Pilipinas (President of the Philippines): Benigno Simeon Cojuangco Aquino III, Tagapangasiwa NG Bangko Sentral (Governor of the Central Bank): Amando Maglalang Tetangco Jr. (in office from 4 July 2005 until 3 July 2017)
Serie: New Generation Currency series
Specimen of: 17.10.2010
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 160 х 66
Printer: BSP - Security Plant Complex, Diliman, Quezon City

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

500 Piso 2016

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Corazon C. Aquino and Benigno S. Aquino, Jr.. Denomination 500.

Avers:

500 Piso 2016

EDSA I Corazon C Aquino EDSA I

On banknote are María Corazón Cojuangco-Aquino and Benigno S. Aquino, Jr.

Maria Corazon "Cory" Cojuangco Aquino (January 25, 1933 – August 1, 2009) was a Chinese Filipino politician who served as the 11th President of the Philippines, becoming the first woman to hold that office. The first female president in the Philippines, Aquino was the most prominent figure of the 1986 People Power Revolution, which toppled the 21-year rule of President Ferdinand Marcos. She was named Time magazine's Woman of the Year in 1986. Prior to this, she had not held any other elective office.

A self-proclaimed "plain housewife", she was married to Senator Benigno Aquino Jr., the staunchest critic of President Marcos. She emerged as leader of the opposition after her husband was assassinated on August 21, 1983 upon returning to the Philippines from exile in the United States. In late 1985, Marcos called for snap elections, and Aquino ran for president with former senator Salvador Laurel as her Vice President. After the elections were held on February 7, 1986, the Batasang Pambansa proclaimed Marcos and his running mate, Arturo Tolentino, as the winners amid allegations of electoral fraud, with Aquino calling for massive civil disobedience actions. Defections from the Armed Forces of the Philippines and the support of the local Catholic hierarchy led to the People Power Revolution that ousted Marcos and secured Aquino's accession on February 25, 1986.

As President, Aquino oversaw the promulgation of the 1987 Constitution, which limited the powers of the Presidency and re-established the bicameral Congress. Her administration gave strong emphasis and concern for civil liberties and human rights, and on peace talks to resolve the ongoing Communist insurgency and Islamist secession movements. Her economic policies centered on restoring economic health and confidence and focused on creating a market-oriented and socially responsible economy. She became the first Filipino to be bestowed with the prestigious Prize For Freedom Award in 1987.

Aquino faced several coup attempts against her government and various natural calamities until the end of her term in 1992. She was succeeded as President by Fidel Ramos, and returned to civilian life while remaining public about her opinions on political issues. In recognition for her role in the world's most peaceful revolution to attain democracy, she was awarded the prestigious Ramon Magsaysay Award in 1998.

In 2008, Aquino was diagnosed with colorectal cancer and died on August 1, 2009. Her monuments of peace and democracy were established in the capital Manila and her home province of Tarlac after her death. Her son Benigno Aquino III became President of the Philippines from June 30, 2010 to June 30, 2016. Throughout her life, Aquino was known to be a devout Roman Catholic, and was fluent in French, Japanese, Spanish, and English aside from her native Tagalog and Kapampangan. She is highly regarded by the international diplomatic community as the Mother of Asian and Philippine Democracy.

Benigno Aquino, Jr

Benigno Simeon "Ninoy" Aquino Jr. (November 27, 1932 – August 21, 1983) was a Filipino politician who served as a Senator of the Philippines (1967–1972) and governor of the province of Tarlac. He was the husband of former Philippine President Corazon Aquino and father of former Philippine President Benigno Aquino III. Aquino, together with Gerardo Roxas and Jovito Salonga, formed the leadership of the opposition towards then President Ferdinand Marcos. Shortly after the imposition of martial law, he was arrested in 1972 along with others associated with the Communists' armed insurgency and incarcerated for seven years. He founded his own party, Lakas ng Bayan, and ran in the 1978 Philippine parliamentary election, but all of the party's candidates, including Aquino, lost in the election. In 1980, Aquino was permitted by Marcos to travel to the United States for medical treatment following a heart attack. He was assassinated at the Manila International Airport in 1983 upon returning from his self-imposed exile. His death catapulted his widow, Corazon, into the political limelight, and prompted her to run for president as member of the UNIDO party in the 1986 snap elections.

Among other public structures, Manila International Airport has since been renamed Ninoy Aquino International Airport in his honor, and the anniversary of his death is a national holiday.

The seal of Central Bank of Philippines is right of center.

coat

The coat of arms of Philippines is centered.

The Coat of arms of the Philippines (Filipino: Sagisag ng Pilipinas) or sometimes in (Spanish: Escudo de Filipinas) features the eight-rayed sun of the Philippines with each ray representing the eight provinces (Batangas, Bulacan, Cavite, Manila, Laguna, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga and Tarlac) which were placed under martial law by Governor-General Ramón Blanco during the Philippine Revolution, and the three five-pointed stars representing the three primary geographic regions of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao.

On the blue field on the dexter side is the North American bald eagle of the United States, and on the red field on the sinister side is the lion rampant of the coat of arms of the Kingdom of León of Spain, both representing the country's colonial past. The current arms, which shares many features of the national flag, was designed by Filipino artist and heraldist Captain Galo B. Ocampo.

The blazon of the coat of arms from Flag and Heraldic Code of the Philippines (Republic Act 8491) is as follows:

“...Paleways of two (2) pieces, azure and gules; a chief argent studded with three (3) mullets equidistant from each other; and, in point of honor, ovoid argent over all the sun rayonnant with eight minor and lesser rays. Beneath shall be the scroll with the words "REPUBLIKA NG PILIPINAS", inscribed thereon.”

Its original blazoning according to Commonwealth Act No. 731 is:

“Pale ways of two pieces, azure and gules; a chief argent studded with three golden stars equidistant from each other; in point of honor, ovoid argent over all the sun rayonnant with eight minor and lesser rays; in sinister base gules, the Lion Rampant of Spain; in dexter base azure, the American eagle displayed proper. Beneath, a scroll with the words 'Republic of the Philippines' inscribed thereon.”

1986

in lower left corner is The People Power Revolution of 1986.

The People Power Revolution (also known as the EDSA Revolution and the Philippine Revolution of 1986 or simply EDSA 1986) was a series of popular demonstrations in the Philippines, mostly in the capital city of Manila from February 22–25, 1986. There was a sustained campaign of civil resistance against regime violence and alleged electoral fraud. The nonviolent revolution led to the departure of dictator Ferdinand Marcos, the end of his 21-year presidential rule, and the restoration of democracy in the Philippines.

It is also referred to as the Yellow Revolution due to the presence of yellow ribbons during demonstrations following the assassination of Filipino senator Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino, Jr. in August 1983. It was widely seen as a victory of the people against two decades of presidential rule by President Marcos, and made news headlines as "the revolution that surprised the world".

The majority of the demonstrations took place on a long stretch of Epifanio de los Santos Avenue, more commonly known by its acronym EDSA, in Metro Manila from February 22–25, 1986. They involved over two million Filipino civilians, as well as several political and military groups, and religious groups led by Cardinal Jaime Sin, the Archbishop of Manila, along with Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines President Cardinal Ricardo Vidal, the Archbishop of Cebu. The protests, fueled by the resistance and opposition from years of governance by President Marcos and his cronies, culminated with the absolute rule and his family fleeing Malacañang Palace to exile in Hawaii. Ninoy Aquino's widow, Corazon Aquino, was immediately installed as the eleventh President as a result of the revolution.

monument

At the bottom, centered is the Benigno Aquino monument in Makati City.

The Ninoy Aquino Monument is a bronze monument by sculptor Peter de Guzman which commemorates the slain of former senator and Filipino hero Benigno “Ninoy” S. Aquino Jr., the father of the current President of the Philippines, Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III. As one of the leaders in the opposition against the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, Ninoy protested the social injustices committed during the martial law for years and publicly attached Marcos’ regime.

Ninoy Aquino was assassinated in 1983 at the Manila International Airport. His widow, Corazon “Cory” C. Aquino, became part of the movement to regain democracy. In 1986, Cory Aquino ran against Marcos in the snap presidential elections. Despite massive cheating in the polls in favor of Marcos, Cory was sworn in as the first female President of the Philippines through a peaceful People Power Revolution.

Because of Ninoy Aquino’s heroism, the Ninoy Aquino Monument was built in the corner of Ayala Avenue and Paseo de Roxas in his honor. It is at the southwestern edge of Ayala Triangle where the Makati Stocks Exchange (south), Gabriela Silang Monument (south southeast) and the Filipinas Heritage Library (southeast) and are also situated. (www.phtourguide.com)

In the foiled window, the image of the reverse is repeated - a blue-naped parrot (Tanygnathus Lucionensis) sits on a branch.

Denominations in numerals are in top left and lower right corners. In words lower, centered.

Revers:

500 Piso 2016

On banknote are:

1) Subterranean Underground River in Puerto Princesa, Palawan.

2) Tanygnathus lucionensis (blue-naped parrot).

3) Southern Philippines cloth design.

4) Map of the Philippines with a marked province of Palawan.

Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park

The Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park is a protected area of the Philippines.

It was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999, and voted as a New 7 Wonders of Nature in 2012. It also became a Ramsar Wetland Site in 2012.

The Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park is a protected area of the Philippines located about 80 kilometers (50 mi.) north of the city center of Puerto Princesa, Palawan. The river is also called 'Puerto Princesa Underground River'. The national park is located in the Saint Paul Mountain Range on the western coast of the island. It is bordered by St. Paul Bay to the north and the Babuyan River to the east. The City Government of Puerto Princesa has managed the National Park since 1992. The entrance to the subterranean river is a short hike or boat ride from the town Sabang.

In 2010, a group of environmentalists and geologists discovered that the underground river has a second floor, which means that there are small waterfalls inside the cave. They also found a cave dome measuring 300 m. (980 ft.) above the underground river, rock formations, large bats, a deep water hole in the river, more river channels, and another deep cave, as well as marine creatures and more. Deeper areas of the underground river are almost impossible to explore due to oxygen deprivation.

On November 11, 2011, Puerto Princesa Underground River was provisionally chosen as one of the New7Wonders of Nature. This selection was officially confirmed on January 28, 2012.

The park has a limestone karst mountain landscape. St. Pauls Underground River Cave is more than 24 km. (15 mi.) long and contains an 8.2 km. (5.1 mi.) long underground section of the Cabayugan River. The river winds through the cave before flowing directly into the West Philippine Sea and is navigable by boat up to 4.3 km. (2.7 mi.) in from the sea. The cave includes major formations of stalactites and stalagmites, and several large chambers, including the 360-meter-long Italian's Chamber with approximate 2.5 million square meters volume. It is one of the largest cave rooms in the world. The lower portion of the river up to 6 km from the sea, is subject to tidal influences. Until the 2007 discovery of an underground river in Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula, the Puerto Princesa Subterranean River was reputed to be the world's longest underground river.

The area also represents a habitat for biodiversity conservation. The site contains a full mountain-to-the-sea ecosystem and has some of the most important forests in Asia. It was inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site on December 4, 1999.

The park has a range of forest formations representing eight of the thirteen forest types found in tropical Asia, namely forest over ultramafic soils, forest over limestone soils, montane forest, freshwater swamp forest, lowland evergreen tropical rainforest, riverine forest, beach forest, and mangrove forest. Researchers have identified more than 800 plant species from 300 genera and 100 families. These include at least 295 trees dominated by the dipterocarp species. In the lowland forest, large trees such as the Dao (Dracontomelon dao), Ipil (Intsia bijuga), Dita (Alstonia scholaris), Amugis (Koordersiodendron pinnatum), and Apitong (Dipterocarpus gracilis) are common. Beach forest species include Bitaog (Calophyllum inophyllum), Pongamia pinnata, and Erynthia orientalis. Other notable plant species include Almaciga (Agathis philippinensis), Kamagong (Diospyros pulganensis) Pandan (Pandanus sp.) Anibong, and Rattan ('Calamus sp.)

Birds comprise the largest group of vertebrates found in the park. Of the 252 bird species known to occur in Palawan, a total of 165 species of birds were recorded in the park. This represents 67% of the total birds and all of the 15 endemic bird species of Palawan. Notable species seen in the park are the blue-naped parrot (Tanygnathus lucionensis), Tabon scrub fowl (Megapodius cumunigii), hill myna (Gracula religiosa), Palawan hornbill (Anthracoceros marchei), white breasted sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster).

There are also some 30 mammal species that have been recorded.[6] Most often observed in the forest canopy and along the shoreline feeding during low tide is the long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis), the only primate found in the area. Other mammal species in the park are the bearded pig (Sus barbatus), bearcat (Arctictis binturong), Palawan stink badger (Mydaus marchei) and the Palawan porcupine (Hystrix pumila)

19 species of reptiles have been identified, eight of which are endemic. Common species in the area include large predators like the common reticulated python [Python reticulates], the monitor lizard (Varanus salvator) and the green crested lizard (Bronchocoela cristatella). Amphibian fauna include ten species. The Philippine woodland frog (Rana acanthi) is the most dominant and frequently encountered. One species, Barbourula busuangensis, endemic to Palawan was also observed in the area.

Notable are the nine species of bats, two species of swiftlets and whip spider (Stygophrynus sp.) found in the cave, and the sea cow (Dugong dugon) and the hawksbill sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) that feed in the coastal area of the park.

Tanygnathus Lucionensis

The blue-naped parrot sitting on tree branch.

The blue-naped parrot (Tanygnathus lucionensis), also known as the blue-crowned green parrot, Luzon parrot, the Philippine green parrot, and locally known as pikoy, is a parrot found throughout the Philippines.

In 1760 the French zoologist Mathurin Jacques Brisson included a description of the blue-naped parrot in his Ornithologie based on a specimen collected on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. He used the French name Le perroquet de l'Isle de Luçon and the Latin name Psittacus lucionensis. Although Brisson coined Latin names, these do not conform to the binomial system and are not recognised by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. When in 1766 the Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus updated his Systema Naturae for the twelfth edition he added 240 species that had been previously described by Brisson. One of these was the blue-naped parrot. Linnaeus included a terse description, used the binomial name Psittacus lucionensis and cited Brisson's work. The specific name lucionensis is from Luzon in the Philippines. This species is now placed in the genus Tanygnathus which was introduced by the German naturalist Johann Wagler in 1832.

There are four subspecies:

T. l. lucionensis: Luzon and Mindoro

T. l. hybridus: Polillo Islands. Blue on crown less extensive, tinged with violet. More green on wing coverts.

T. l. salvadorii: Rest of Philippines

T. l. talautensis: Talaud

This is a medium size parrot, around 31 cm (12 in) in length, primarily green except for a light blue rear crown and nape, pale blue lower back and rump, scalloped shoulders with orange-brown on black coverts, and blackish underwings with green underwing coverts.

The species is widespread throughout the Philippines, including the Talaud Islands and islands off north and east Borneo (with introduced population in Borneo itself, e.g. Kota Kinabalu). It is found in secondary forest, at forest edges and in plantations at elevations of up to 1000 m. Flock size is usually under a dozen. The blue-naped parrot feeds on mangoes, berries, seeds, nuts and grains. It nests in tree holes.

On right side is Southern Philippines cloth design.

Denominations in numerals are in top corners. In words centered, at bottom.

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