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1 Pound 1967, Rhodesia

in Krause book Number: 28
Years of issue: 01.09.1967
Edition: --
Signatures: Governor: Mr. Noel Hugh Botha Bruce
Serie: Sterling area
Specimen of: 15.06.1966
Material: 100% raw cotton
Size (mm): 150 х 83
Printer: RBR, Salisbury

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

1 Pound 1967

Description

Watermark:

watermark

The Rt. Hon. Cecil John Rhodes DCL (5 July 1853 - 26 March 1902) was a British businessman, mining magnate, and politician in South Africa. Rhodes was named the chairman of De Beers at the company's founding in 1888. De Beers, established with funding from NM Rothschild & Sons Limited in 1887, today markets 40% of the world's rough diamonds, and at one time marketed 90%. An ardent believer in British colonialism, Rhodes was the founder of the southern African territory of Rhodesia, which was named after him in 1895. South Africa's Rhodes University is also named after Rhodes. He set up the provisions of the Rhodes Scholarship, which is funded by his estate.

Avers:

1 Pound 1967

HM The Queen

This widely used portrait of the Queen is adapted from a painting by Pietro Annigoni. HM standing regally with a distant, but lonely aspect. The portrait is regarded by many as one of the finest portrayals of the young Queen.

It was privately commissioned by the „Worshipful Company of Fishmongers” in 1954, but not completed until 1956. The Queen displayed in white portrait room at Buckingham Palace. The painting is now displayed in Fishmongers Hall, in London.

The engraving on banknote made from this portrait.

HM depicted in Mantle of the Order of the Garter.

One of the most distinctive pieces of the wardrobe of the Most Noble Order of the Garter - England's highest chivalric order - is the Mantle, sometimes referred to as a robe, cloak, or cape. The Mantle has been used in one form or another, with varying fabrics and colors, since the 15th century. The current version is made of dark blue velvet lined with white taffeta and is accented by a red velvet hood (also lined with white taffeta), elaborate cords for closure, and white ribbons at the shoulders. The Garter Collar, with the Great George as a pendant (not visible in the portrait), is draped over the Mantle across the shoulders. (Her Majesty’s Jewel vault)

Order of the Garter

Various legends account for the origin of the Order. The most popular legend involves the "Countess of Salisbury" (either Edward's future daughter-in-law Joan of Kent or her former mother-in-law, Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury). While she was dancing at a court ball at Calais, her garter is said to have slipped from her leg. When the surrounding courtiers sniggered, the king picked it up and returned it to her, exclaiming: "Honi soit qui mal y pense," ("Shamed be the person who thinks evil of it."), the phrase that has become the motto of the Order.

A representation of a blue garter adorned with the motto of the Order of the Garter (Honi soit qui mal y pense, "Shame on he who thinks ill of it") can be seen on various items worn by members of the Order, but a far more rare sight today is the actual Garter that comes along with the rest of the insignia. The Garter is made of a blue fabric embellished with the Order's motto and closed with a buckle. The materials and design can vary (blue velvet and diamonds or blue silk and gold, for example). (Her Majesty’s Jewel vault)

On the left shoulder of Her Majesty is the Order of the Garter Star.

Order of the Garter Star

This star was given to The Queen (when Princess Elizabeth) by King George VI at the time of her investiture with the Order of the Garter in 1947. The star (and accompanying badge) were originally a present from the Royal Navy to the King (when Duke of York) at the time of his wedding in 1923. The Queen wore the badge and star with the Coronation Dress during her Commonwealth tour of 1953-1954.

The Queen, as Sovereign of the Order, has a fancier Mantle than the rest of the members: hers has the longest train, which requires two Pages of Honour to manage, and a Garter Star. The rest of the members wear a Mantle with a sewn on patch depicting the heraldic shield of St. George's Cross encircled by the famous blue garter which bears the Order's motto, “Honi soit qui mal y pense” ("Shame on he who thinks ill of it"). The Queen's Mantle has a bejeweled Garter Star of metal. (The Royal Tour)

Queen Alexandra’s Cluster Earrings

She is also wearing Queen Alexandra’s Cluster Earrings. The wedding gift from the future King Edward VII to his bride, Alexandra of Denmark. Also known as Queen Alexandra's Cluster Earrings, these two button earrings have large pearls surrounded by diamonds - 10 larger stones each plus smaller filler stones to create a full diamond ring. Like the brooch, these passed to the Queen via Queen Mary. They're now worn primarily at evening functions.

coat of arms of Rhodesia

Centered, at the top, is the coat of arms of Rhodesia.

Coat of arms depicts two black antelope, standing atop an earthen mound. Also located at the bottom of the inscription: Sit Nomine Digna (Maybe worthy of its name) associated with Rhodes. the shield golden hammer on a green background, indicating the extraction of natural resources, the basis of economic stability Rhodesia.

Great bird figurine from soapstone on top, found in the ruins of Great Zimbabwe.

Great Zimbabwe is a ruined city in the southeastern hills of Zimbabwe near Lake Mutirikwe and the town of Masvingo, close to the Chimanimani Mountains and the Chipinge District. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe during the country's Late Iron Age. Construction on the monument by ancestors of the Shona people began in the XI century and continued until the XIV century, spanning an area of 722 hectares (1,780 acres) which, at its peak, could have housed up to 18,000 people. It is recognised as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

G. rothschildiana

In lower left corner and on background are the Gloriosa superba "Rothschildiana", G. rothschildiana

This unusual vining lily with long-lasting bright red and gold blooms can flower from Summer to Fall. Native to Uganda, center of tropical Africa.

National flower emblem of Zambia.

Denominations in numerals are in three corners, in words in center.

Revers:

1 Pound 1967

Devils Cataract Victoria falls

On banknote - Victoria Falls. On left side you can see Devils Cataract.

Devil's Cataract, on the Zimbabwe side of the Falls, is the lowest of the five Falls, with a drop of 60 meters. It is separated from the rest of the Falls by Boaruka Island, also known as Cataract Island.

Boaruka is the Tonga word for "divider of waters". The Devil's Cataract is the weakest point in the geological composition of this waterfall system. Here, the Zambezi has cut a 10-metre-deep nick in the hard basalt and, as the nick is eroded away, more and more water will be channelled through it away from the rest of the Falls. At some point in the future - it could be sometime in the next 20000 years - Devil's Cataract will cut back into one of the east-west joints that are filled with softer material. This may happen slowly over time, or could happen catastrophically if part or all of Boaruka Island should collapse into the gorge below. (www.siyabona.com)

Victoria Falls, or Mosi-oa-Tunya (Tokaleya Tonga: the Smoke that Thunders), is a waterfall in southern Africa on the Zambezi River at the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe (Rhodesia).

David Livingstone, the Scottish missionary and explorer, is believed to have been the first European to view Victoria Falls on 16 November 1855 from what is now known as Livingstone Island, one of two land masses in the middle of the river, immediately upstream from the falls on the Zambian side. Livingstone named his discovery in honour of Queen Victoria, but the indigenous name "Mosi-oa-Tunya" - "the smoke that thunders" - continues in common usage as well. The nearby national park in Zambia, for example, is named "Mosi-oa-Tunya", whereas the national park and town on the Zimbabwean shore are both named Victoria Falls. The World Heritage List officially recognizes both names.

Victoria - the only waterfall in the world, having more than 100 meters high and more than a kilometer wide.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners, in words lower in center.

Comments:

Red serial number!

TDLR Portrait Bradbury Wilkinson Portrait De La Rue version of the portrait. In this version, the darker shading on the side of The Queen's face below her temple has a distinct edge, highlighting her cheekbone. In addition, the braid on her cloak is drawn more simply and regularly.

Bradbury Wilkinson version of the portrait. The distinguishing features of this portrait are the even shading on side of The Queen's face, below her temple, and the distinct highlights given to the braid on the front of Her cloak, which originates from the bow on Her left shoulder.

The pound was the currency of Rhodesia from 1964 until 1970. It was subdivided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pence.

The Rhodesian pound was introduced following the break-up of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland, when Southern Rhodesia changed its name to simply Rhodesia. The Rhodesian pound replaced the Rhodesia and Nyasaland pound at par and the coins and banknotes of this earlier currency continued to circulate.

Like its predecessor, the Rhodesian pound was initially pegged to the British pound. When the British pound was devalued from US$2.8 to US$2.4 in 1967, Rhodesia switched its peg to 1 pound = US$2.8. In 1970, the pound was replaced by the dollar, at a rate of 1 pound = 2 dollars, so R$1 was US$1.40.

Beginning in 1964, banknotes were issued in denominations of 10 shillings, 1 and 5 pounds. All notes featured Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse. The reverse designs were reused on the new dollar notes introduced on 17 February 1970. These dollar notes are like the pound issues, but with new currency units, the bank logo replaces the coat of arms, and the coat of arms replaces the portrait of Queen Elizabeth II.

Prior to UDI, Rhodesia was a member of the sterling zone. The banknotes were printed and supplied from the UK by the printers Bradbury Wilkinson. After UDI, the British government expelled Rhodesia from the sterling zone and the supply of banknotes dried up. This very soon had an adverse effect in Rhodesia, and the shortage of new notes and the condition of those in circulation began to become a pressing concern.

In early 1966, the Reserve Bank of Rhodesia ordered a completely new series of Rhodesian pound banknotes from the German printers Giesecke & Devrient in Munich. A court injunction prevented the banknotes from being despatched to Rhodesia, and the entire order was destroyed by the printers. Substitute consignments were printed in Rhodesia between 1966 and October 1968.