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5 Pounds Sterling 2005, Falkland Islands

in Krause book Number: 17
Years of issue: 14.06.2005
Edition:
Signatures: Commisioner's of currency: Mr. Derek Howatt, Mr. Peter King, Mrs. Moira C. Eccles
Serie: HM The Queen Elizabeth II
Specimen of: 14.06.1983
Material: 100% raw cotton
Size (mm): 145 х 75
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

5 Pounds Sterling 2005

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Cornerstones.

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5 Pounds Sterling 2005

Portrait of the Queen

HM The Queen Elizabeth II. The photograph that was used of the Queen was taken in April 1975 by the late Reading-based photographer Peter Grugeon and later released for official use during the Silver Jubilee in 1977. It is one of the more popular images of The Queen. (Peter Symes).

Her Majesty is depicted wearing Grand Duchess Vladimir's tiara, Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee necklace, the Royal Family Orders of King George VI and George V and Queen Alexandra's Wedding Earrings.

Tiara

The Grand Duchess Vladimir Tiara.

No tiara is complete without a fascinating backstory, and this one's even got a daring escape. Made by Bolin, it glittered at the Russian royal court on the head of Grand Duchess Vladimir until the revolution, when it was left behind as the family fled. A British agent and friend smuggled it out of Russia to rejoin the exiled Grand Duchess and her collection. After her death, the tiara was bought from her daughter by Queen Mary. It's worn often today by the Queen with pearl or emerald drops, or occasionally with no drops. The pearl drop option has been the most popular with the Queen in recent years, probably owing to her love of white gowns in the evening and accompanying white jewels.

Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee necklace

To mark Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee in 1887, a committee of ladies was formed to raise money for a commemorative statue of Victoria’s late husband Prince Albert. The committee’s fundraising was quite successful, and they ended up raising far more than was required for the statue. An agreement was formed with the Queen that the excess should go to the St. Katherine’s Fund for Nurses. At the same time, some members of the committee decided that a portion of the funds should be used to purchase a necklace for the Queen - and this was also approved by Her Majesty.

The trouble was, the committee did not agree on the necklace. Some felt it would be wrong to spend the funds which had been previously devoted to charity on something else. Much discussion and debate ensued, as is described in depth in Hugh Roberts’ book The Queen’s Diamonds. (My favorite tidbit: Queen Victoria, angry that she wouldn’t get her promised necklace, shot down the prospect of a diamond badge commemorating the nursing fund by declaring she would “at once exchange it for another jewel”.

In the end, a compromise was reached and this necklace, made for £5000 (far less than the necklace originally proposed) from gold, diamonds, and pearls by Carrington & Co. was presented to Queen Victoria in 1888. It features a central quatrefoil diamond motif with a large pearl in the middle, topped by a crown and underlined with a drop pearl. The next four links in either direction are graduated trefoil motifs; the central piece and the six largest trefoils can also be worn as brooches.

Queen Alexandra’s Cluster Earrings

She is also wearing Queen Alexandra’s Cluster Earrings. The wedding gift from the future King Edward VII to his bride, Alexandra of Denmark. Also known as Queen Alexandra's Cluster Earrings, these two button earrings have large pearls surrounded by diamonds - 10 larger stones each plus smaller filler stones to create a full diamond ring. Like the brooch, these passed to the Queen via Queen Mary. They're now worn primarily at evening functions.

Royal Family Orders.

King George IV started a practice in the British royal family which continues today: the awarding of family orders. These are diamond-set portraits of the monarch suspended from a silk bow (the color varying by reign), and they are today given to female royal family members of the sovereign's choosing as a personal gift.

Royal Family Order George V

Queen Elizabeth was first given her grandfather George V's order, set on pale blue silk.

Royal Family Order George VI

Followed by her father George VI's, on pink silk, and she wears them both today. (A royal lady can wear all the family orders she has at once.) The orders are positioned on the left shoulder. They are worn for the most formal events, and can usually be seen on the Queen when she's at a tiara event.

In most renditions of this portrait, the Royal Family Order of King George VI is apparent below the left-hand shoulder of Her Majesty, while the uppermost portion of the Royal Family Order of King George V is apparent in only some renditions of the portrait. (Her majesty's Jewel Vault)

Centered, on background, is the map of Falklands.

Otaria flavescens

On right side are The South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens, formerly Otaria byronia).

They also called the southern sea lion and the Patagonian sea lion, is a sea lion found on the Ecuadorian, Peruvian, Chilean, Argentinean, Uruguayan, and Southern Brazilian coasts. It is the only member of the genus Otaria. Its scientific name was subject to controversy, with some taxonomists referring to it as Otaria flavescens and others referring to it as Otaria byronia. The former eventually won out, although that may still be overturned. Locally, it is known by several names, most commonly lobo marino (es)/lobo marinho (pt) (sea wolf) and león marino (es)/leão marinho (pt) (sea lion).

The South American sea lion is perhaps the archetypal sea lion in appearance. Males have a very large head with a well-developed mane, making them the most lionesque of the eared seals. They are twice the weight of females. Both males and females are orange or brown coloured with upturned snouts. Pups are born greyish orange ventrally and black dorsally and moult into a more chocolate colour.

The South American sea lion's size and weight can vary considerably. Adult males can grow over 2.73 m. (9 ft.) and weigh up to 350 kg. (770 lb.). Adult females grow up to 1.8-2 m. (6-7 ft.) and weigh about half the weight of the males, around 150 kg. (330 lb.). This species is even more sexually dimorphic than the other sea lions.

The South American sea lion is found along the coasts and offshore islands of South America, from Peru south to Chile in the Pacific and then north to southern Brazil in the Atlantic. It travels north during the winter and spring and goes south to breed. Notable breeding colonies include Lobos Island, Uruguay; Peninsula Valdes, Argentina; Beagle Channel, and the Falkland Islands. Some individuals wander as far north as southern Ecuador, although apparently they never bred there.

Aptenodytes patagonicus

On left side are 2 King penguins with small chick.

The king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) is a large species of penguin, second only to the emperor penguin in size. There are two subspecies: A. p. patagonicus and A. p. halli; patagonicus is found in the South Atlantic.

King penguins eat small fish, mainly lanternfish, and squid. They are less reliant on krill and other crustaceans than most Southern Ocean predators. On foraging trips king penguins repeatedly dive to over 100 metres (300 ft), and have been recorded at depths greater than 300 meters (1,000 ft.).

King penguins breed on the subantarctic islands at the northern reaches of Antarctica, South Georgia, and other temperate islands of the region.

coat of arms

Lower, left is The Coat of arms of the Falkland Islands.

The coat of arms of the Falkland Islands was granted to the Falkland Islands on 29 September 1948. It consists of a shield containing The Romney Marsh sheep on tussock grass, in the field, with a sailing ship underneath and the motto of the Falklands (Desire the Right) below.

The ship represents the Desire, the vessel in which the English sea-captain John Davis is reputed to have discovered the Falkland Islands in 1592; the motto, Desire the Right, also refers to the ship's name.

The Romney Marsh sheep represents sheep farming, which until recently was the principal economic activity of the islands, and the tussock grass shows the most notable native vegetation.

The Romney, formerly called the Romney Marsh sheep but generally referred to by the local farmers as the Kent, is a breed of sheep originating in England. The Romney is a "long-wool" breed recognized in England by 1800. Exported to other continents, the Romney is an economically important sheep breed, especially to the sheep-meat and wool export trades of New Zealand.

Denominations in numerals are in lower left and top right corners, in words - centered.

Revers:

5 Pounds Sterling 2005

Government House

The Government House in Port Stanley, Falkland islands.

Government House has been the home of the Falkland Islands' London-appointed Governors since the mid-XIX century. The official residence was built in 1845.

The 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica says in the Falkland Islands article that "Government House, grey, stone-built and slated, calls to mind a manse in Shetland or Orkney."

Sir Ernest Shackleton stayed here during his famous expedition. Allegedly, he described his time there as being "far colder than any time on the ice". Whether that refers to the welcome he received or the temperature is not clear.

It is a listed building.

It was the site of a major battle during the Argentine invasion of the Falklands in 1982.

A compulsory ceremony at by visiting a building is a record in the "register of visitors", a tribute to the tradition and government of the islands.

FKLcathedral

On right side is The Christ Church Cathedral and whalebone arch, on Ross road, in Port Stanley, Falkland islands.

Christ Church Cathedral on Ross Road, in Stanley, Falkland Islands, is the southernmost Anglican cathedral in the world, consecrated in 1892. It is the parish church of the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and the British Antarctic Territories. The Parish of the Falkland Islands is part of the Anglican Communion. The Rector of the Cathedral is under the ordinary jurisdiction of the Bishop of the Falkland Islands; since 1978 this office has been held ex officio by the Archbishop of Canterbury, who is both ordinary and metropolitan for the small autonomous diocese. In practice authority is exercised through a bishop-commissary appointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, and known as the Bishop for the Falkland Islands.

The church was designed by Sir Arthur Blomfield and built in 1890-1892, from the local stone and brick.

The Cathedral is built on the site of Holy Trinity Church, which was destroyed by the peat slip, that destroyed part of Stanley in 1886.

The Cathedral is in possession of the Garter banner of Edward Shackleton, Baron Shackleton, which hung in St. George's Chapel in Windsor during his lifetime.

Today the building of the cathedral houses a museum and several memorial plaques in memory of the Falkland soldiers, who died in the battles of world wars.

In the front of this church stands a monument - a whalebone arch, made from the jaws of two blue whales. The monument was raised in 1933 to commemorate the centenary of the British rule in Falkland Islands.

Comments:

TDLR Portrait Bradbury Wilkinson Portrait The De La Rue engraving, as well as reflecting the differences mentioned in Portrait 17a, also represents The Queen with a more cheerful aspect, achieving this through slight differences around Her eyes and lips.

Bradbury Wilkinson's version of this portrait has less shading on The Queen's neck just above Her necklace, than is apparent on the De La Rue engravings (Portrait 17b). There are other subtle variations to the second version, noticeably in the patterns on Her Majesty's dress.