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100 Dollars 2016, Barbados

in Krause book Number: 78b
Years of issue: 15.11.2016
Edition:
Signatures: Governor: Dr. DeLisle Worrell (2009 - 2017)
Serie: 2013 Issue
Specimen of: 03.05.2013
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 150 x 65
Printer: De la Rue currency,Loughton

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100 Dollars 2016

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Sir Grantley Herbert Adams, denomination 100 and cornerstones.

Avers:

100 Dollars 2016

Grantley Herbert Adams

Sir Grantley Herbert Adams, CMG, QC (28 April 1898 – 28 November 1971), was a Barbadian and British West Indian statesman. Adams was a founder of the Barbados Labour Party (BLP), and he was named in 1998 as one of the National Heroes of Barbados.

Adams was born at Colliston, Government Hill, St. Michael, on 28 April 1898. He was the third child of seven born to Fitzherbert Adams and the former Rosa Frances Turney. Adams was educated at St. Giles and at Harrison College in Barbados. In 1918, he won the BScholarship and departed the following year for his undergraduate studies at Oxford University. Adams played a single match of first-class cricket for Barbados during the 1925-1926 season, as a wicket-keeper against British Guiana in the Inter-Colonial Tournament.

Adams was married to Grace Thorne in 1929 at St. John's Church. Their only child, Tom, himself won the Barbados Scholarship and attended Oxford to become a lawyer. Tom Adams would later be elected as Barbados' second Prime Minister in 1976.

Adams was president of the Barbados Workers' Union (BWU) from 1941 to 1954. While being a staunch supporter of the monarchy, Adams and his party also demanded more rights for the poor and for the people. Progress toward a more democratic government in Barbados was made in 1942, when the exclusive income qualification was lowered and women were given the right to vote. By 1949, governmental control was wrested from the planters.

Adams became the Prime Minister of the West Indies Federation, defeating Ashford Sinanan by two votes. (Sinanan went on to serve as Leader of the Opposition of Trinidad's Democratic Labour Party.) Adams served this role from 1958 to 1962; Barbados was one of the ten provinces of the West Indies Federation, an organisation doomed by nationalistic attitudes and by the fact that its members, as British colonies, held limited legislative power.

As Premier of Barbados, his leadership failed in attempts to form unions such as the BWU, and his continued defence of the monarchy was used by his opponents as evidence that he was no longer in touch with the needs of his country. Errol Walton Barrow, a fervent reformer, became the new people's advocate. Barrow had left the BLP and formed the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) as a liberal alternative to Adams' conservative government. Barrow instituted many progressive social programmes, including free education for all Barbadians, and the School Meals system. By 1961, Barrow had replaced Adams as Premier and the DLP controlled the government.

Grantley Adams International Airport, formerly Seawell Airport, located in Christ Church, Barbados, was named after the former Prime Minister in 1976. A statue in honour of Adams is located in front of Government Headquarters at Bay Street, St. Michael.

Adams is one of Barbados' National Heroes. He was the father of Barbados' second Prime Minister following independence, the late J. M. G. "Tom" Adams.

He was buried in Bridgetown, Barbados, at the churchyard of the Anglican Cathedral Church of Saint Michael and All Angels on Saint Michael's Row.

The former home of Adams, located on Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, today functions as the headquarters of the Barbados Labour Party political group.

coat

In top left corner is the coat of arms.

The coat of arms of Barbados was adopted on 14 February 1966 by royal warrant of Queen Elizabeth II. The coat of arms of Barbados was presented by the Queen to the President of the Senate, Sir Grey Massiah. Like other former British possessions in the Caribbean, the coat of arms has a helmet with a national symbol on top, and a shield beneath that is supported by two animals.

The arms were designed by Neville Connell, for many years curator of the Barbados Museum, with artistic assistance by Hilda Ince.

The national symbol found on top of the helmet for Barbados is the fist of a Barbadian holding two stalks of sugar cane, that are crossed to resemble St. Andrew's Cross. This is representative of the importance of the sugar industry as well as Barbados celebrating its national independence day on St. Andrew's Day.

The shield is gold in colour. Upon it are a pair of the national flower, known as the Pride of Barbados, and a single bearded fig tree (Ficus citrifolia). The shield is supported by a dolphin fish and a pelican. They stand for the fishing industry and Pelican Island, respectively.

At the bottom is Barbados' national motto ("Pride and Industry") on a scroll.

On background and as seen-through image are the tridents.

The trident symbol was taken from Barbados' colonial badge, where the trident of Poseidon is shown with Britannia holding it. The broken lower part symbolizes a symbolic break from its status as a colony. The three points of the trident represent the three principles of democracy: 1) government of the people, 2) government for the people, and 3) government by the people.

Stylized dolphin fish, from coat of arms, and denominations 50 are on right side.

map

On background is the map of Barbados.

Denominations in numerals are in top left and lower right corners, in words centered.

Revers:

100 Dollars 2016

Grantley Adams International Airport Grantley Adams International Airport

Grantley Adams International Airport (GAIA) (IATA: BGI, ICAO: TBPB) is the international airport of Barbados, located in Seawell, Christ Church. It is the only designated port of entry for persons arriving and departing by air in Barbados and operates as a major gateway to the Eastern Caribbean.

Architect: Queen’s Quay Architects International Inc. (Expansion and Renovation).

Completion: 2006 (Original construction by Victor Prus, 1979).

The airport has direct service to destinations in the United States, Canada, Central America and Europe and serves as the second hub for LIAT. In 2016, the airport was the 8th busiest airport in the Caribbean region; and the third busiest airport in the Lesser Antilles; after Queen Beatrix International Airport located in Aruba, and Pointe-à-Pitre International Airport located in the Republic of France within the island of Guadeloupe. GAIA, also remains an important air-link for cruise ship passengers departing and arriving at the Port of Bridgetown, and a base of operations for the Regional Security System (RSS), and the Regional (Caribbean) Police Training Center.

The airport's former name was Seawell Airport before being dedicated posthumously in honour of the first Premier of Barbados, Sir Grantley Herbert Adams in 1976. The airport's timezone is GMT −4 and is in World Area Code region No. 246 (by the US Department of Transportation). It was a hub for now-defunct Barbadian carriers Caribbean Airways and REDjet, the home for the charter carrier West Indies Executive Air, and former home to the flight training school Coconut Airways.

Grantley Adams International Airport, as it is known today, handles most large aircraft including Boeing 747s. The airport was one of the few destinations where British Airways' Concorde aircraft made regularly scheduled flights (and got repairs). The flight time of Concorde from the United Kingdom to Barbados was less than 4 hours.[citation needed] The first Concorde visit to Barbados was in 1977 for the Queen's Silver Jubilee. During the 1980s, the Concorde returned for commercial flights to Barbados and thereafter flew to Barbados during the busy winter season. On 17 October 2011, ZA006, a Boeing 787 Dreamliner arrived at BGI for testing. This was followed by a 24 October arrival of the Boeing 747-8i for further high humidity environment testing.

Since Grantley Adams International Airport had become a relatively busy airport for such a small island and based on an expected increase in future air traffic the Government of Barbados commenced a US$100 million program to revamp the airport's infrastructure.

Phase I, which is now complete, saw an upgrading of the runways, taxiways, parking aprons, and approach lighting. This phase included the Government of Barbados acquiring private land adjacent to the landing strip to bring the airport into compliance with new international aviation regulations.

Phase II (also complete) included adding a new arrivals terminal adjacent to the current building; moving arrivals from the older terminal, renovating the older terminal as a departures facility, and bringing the infrastructure into the new millennium.

On 1 June 2007, the Bds$1.7 million Club Caribbean Executive Lounge and Business Center was opened as an added amenity for business travelers. The center contains 5,000 sq ft (460 m2) and is on the mezzanine level. The center is meant to be used by special customers of several airlines at the terminal.

The Phase III expansion had to wait until the completion of the 2007 Cricket World Cup. It envisions the addition of new airport terminal Jetway (gates), new spacious departure lounges much closer to the aeroplanes and air bridges to make connections much easier. Also nearing completion is the expanded duty-free shopping area and restaurants for travelers. In 2010 airport authorities stated that traffic to the airport was up 58% and that a 20-25-year plan was being formed for the facility including an addition to the taxiway and renovation of the cargo facilities up to international standards.

After the expansion project, the airport's arrivals facility was moved to a separate new 70,000-square-foot (6,500 m2) building adjacent to the previous structure. This allowed the departures area to occupy much of the previous shared structure. The new arrivals terminal was built with five large baggage carousels, along with customs and immigration windows.

Denominations in numerals are in top corners, in words - at the bottom.

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