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50 Rupees 1983, Seychelles

in Krause book Number: 30
Years of issue: 1983
Edition: 899 754
Signatures: Governor: Guy Morel
Serie: 1983 Issue
Specimen of: 1983
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 151 х 75
Printer: Bradbury, Wilkinson & Company Limited, New Malden

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** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

50 Rupees 1983

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Head of the The Seychelles black parrot (Coracopsis barklyi).

Avers:

50 Rupees 1983

New bank name at the top.

Cheloniidea

Sea turtle in center.

Sea turtles (superfamily Chelonioidea), sometimes called marine turtles are reptiles of the order of Testudines. There are seven species of sea turtles. They are the leatherback sea turtle, green sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle, Kemp's ridley sea turtle, hawksbill sea turtle, flatback sea turtle and olive ridley sea turtle. Four of the species have been identified as "endangered" or "critically endangered" with another two being classed as "vulnerable".

Denominations in numerals are in top left and right corners.

Revers:

50 Rupees 1983

Architecture of 1970s on Seychelles. Stylized houses. I did not find yet the location of these houses, but I working on it.

coconut palm

On right side is the coconut palms (Cōcos nucifēra).

The coconut tree (Cocos nucifera) is a member of the family Arecaceae (palm family).

It is the only accepted species in the genus Cocos. The term coconut can refer to the entire coconut palm, the seed, or the fruit, which, botanically, is a drupe, not a nut. The spelling cocoanut is an archaic form of the word. The term is derived from the XIV century Portuguese and Spanish word coco meaning "head" or "skull", from the three indentations on the coconut shell that resemble facial features.

The coconut is known for its great versatility as seen in the many uses of its different parts and found throughout the tropics and subtropics. Coconuts are part of the daily diets of many people. Coconuts are different from any other fruits because they contain a large quantity of "water" and when immature they are known as tender-nuts or jelly-nuts and may be harvested for drinking. When mature, they still contain some water and can be used as seednuts or processed to give oil from the kernel, charcoal from the hard shell and coir from the fibrous husk. The endosperm is initially in its nuclear phase suspended within the coconut water. As development continues, cellular layers of endosperm deposit along the walls of the coconut, becoming the edible coconut "flesh". When dried, the coconut flesh is called copra. The oil and milk derived from it are commonly used in cooking and frying; coconut oil is also widely used in soaps and cosmetics. The clear liquid coconut water within is potable. The husks and leaves can be used as material to make a variety of products for furnishing and decorating. The coconut also has cultural and religious significance in many societies that use it.

Denomination in numeral and in words is lower.

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