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5 Rupees 1967, Mauritius

in Krause book Number: P30a
Years of issue: 01.07.1967 - 29.06.1968
Edition: 12 515 828
Signatures: Governor of the Bank: Mr. Aunauth Beejadhur, Managing director: Mr. D. G. H. Cook
Serie: 1967 Issue
Specimen of: 1967
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 140 х 78
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

5 Rupees 1967

Description

Watermark:

watermark

The Dodo (Raphus cucullatus) is an extinct flightless bird that was endemic to the island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. Its closest genetic relative was the also extinct Rodrigues Solitaire, the two forming the subfamily Raphinae of the family of pigeons and doves.

The closest living relative of the Dodo is the Nicobar Pigeon. A white Dodo was once incorrectly thought to have existed on the nearby island of Réunion.

Subfossil remains show the Dodo was about 1 meter (3.3 feet) tall and may have weighed 10-18 kg (22-40 lb) in the wild. The Dodo's appearance in life is evidenced only by drawings, paintings and written accounts from the XVII century.

Avers:

5 Rupees 1967

HM The Queen

This widely used portrait of the Queen is adapted from a painting by Pietro Annigoni. HM standing regally with a distant, but lonely aspect. The portrait is regarded by many as one of the finest portrayals of the young Queen.

It was privately commissioned by the „Worshipful Company of Fishmongers” in 1954, but not completed until 1956. The Queen displayed in white portrait room at Buckingham Palace. The painting is now displayed in Fishmongers Hall, in London.

The engraving on banknote made from this portrait.

HM depicted in Mantle of the Order of the Garter.

One of the most distinctive pieces of the wardrobe of the Most Noble Order of the Garter - England's highest chivalric order - is the Mantle, sometimes referred to as a robe, cloak, or cape. The Mantle has been used in one form or another, with varying fabrics and colors, since the 15th century. The current version is made of dark blue velvet lined with white taffeta and is accented by a red velvet hood (also lined with white taffeta), elaborate cords for closure, and white ribbons at the shoulders. The Garter Collar, with the Great George as a pendant (not visible in the portrait), is draped over the Mantle across the shoulders. (Her Majesty’s Jewel vault)

Order of the Garter

Various legends account for the origin of the Order. The most popular legend involves the "Countess of Salisbury" (either Edward's future daughter-in-law Joan of Kent or her former mother-in-law, Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury). While she was dancing at a court ball at Calais, her garter is said to have slipped from her leg. When the surrounding courtiers sniggered, the king picked it up and returned it to her, exclaiming: "Honi soit qui mal y pense," ("Shamed be the person who thinks evil of it."), the phrase that has become the motto of the Order.

A representation of a blue garter adorned with the motto of the Order of the Garter (Honi soit qui mal y pense, "Shame on he who thinks ill of it") can be seen on various items worn by members of the Order, but a far more rare sight today is the actual Garter that comes along with the rest of the insignia. The Garter is made of a blue fabric embellished with the Order's motto and closed with a buckle. The materials and design can vary (blue velvet and diamonds or blue silk and gold, for example). (Her Majesty’s Jewel vault)

On the left shoulder of Her Majesty is the Order of the Garter Star.

Order of the Garter Star

This star was given to The Queen (when Princess Elizabeth) by King George VI at the time of her investiture with the Order of the Garter in 1947. The star (and accompanying badge) were originally a present from the Royal Navy to the King (when Duke of York) at the time of his wedding in 1923. The Queen wore the badge and star with the Coronation Dress during her Commonwealth tour of 1953-1954.

The Queen, as Sovereign of the Order, has a fancier Mantle than the rest of the members: hers has the longest train, which requires two Pages of Honour to manage, and a Garter Star. The rest of the members wear a Mantle with a sewn on patch depicting the heraldic shield of St. George's Cross encircled by the famous blue garter which bears the Order's motto, “Honi soit qui mal y pense” ("Shame on he who thinks ill of it"). The Queen's Mantle has a bejeweled Garter Star of metal. (The Royal Tour)

Queen Alexandra’s Cluster Earrings

She is also wearing Queen Alexandra’s Cluster Earrings. The wedding gift from the future King Edward VII to his bride, Alexandra of Denmark. Also known as Queen Alexandra's Cluster Earrings, these two button earrings have large pearls surrounded by diamonds - 10 larger stones each plus smaller filler stones to create a full diamond ring. Like the brooch, these passed to the Queen via Queen Mary. They're now worn primarily at evening functions.

coat of arms of Mauritius

The coat of arms of Mauritius is stipulated in the "Mauritius Laws 1990 Vol.2 SCHEDULE (Section 2)". The arms were designed by the Mayor of Johannesburg in 1906, Johann Van Der Puf. In the lower right quarter is a key and on the left-hand side is a white star, which are referred to in the Latin motto “Stella Clavisque Maris Indici” meaning “The Star and the Key of the Indian Ocean“.

Blazon:

The armorial ensigns and supporters of Mauritius are described as:

(a) for arms- Quarterly azure and gold.In the first quarter a gold Lymphad.

In the second, 3 palm trees vertical.

In the third, a key in pale the wards downwards gules.

In the Issuant, from the base a pile, and in chief a mullet argent.

(b) for the supporters-On the Dexter side, a dodo per bend sinister embattled gules and argent, and, on the sinister side, a Sambar deer per bend embattled argent and gules, each supporting a sugar cane erect properly.

(c) with the motto "Stella Clavisque Maris Indici” (Star and Key of the Indian Ocean).

Denominations in Western numerals are in the lower left and upper right corners. In the upper left and lower right corners - in Bhojpuri language.

Bhojpuri is an Indo-Aryan language spoken in Bhojpuri region of North India and Nepal. It is chiefly spoken in the Purvanchal region of Uttar Pradesh, in the western part of state of Bihar, and the northwestern part of Jharkhand in India. Bhojpuri is also spoken widely in Guyana, Suriname, Fiji, and Mauritius. It is one of the national languages of Guyana, Fiji, and Suriname.

The variant of Bhojpuri of the Indo-Surinamese is also referred to as Sarnami Hindustani, Sarnami Hindi or just Sarnami and has experienced considerable Creole and Dutch lexical influence. More Indians in Suriname know Bhojpuri, whereas in Guyana and Trinidad the language is largely forgotten. In Mauritius a dialect of Bhojpuri remains in use, and it is locally called Bojpury.

Revers:

5 Rupees 1967

Yacht in the harbor of Mahébourg. Also the monument, dedicated to the Battle of Grand Port (1810) and the Lion mountain.

Now more about this places:

5 Rupees 1967 Mauritius 5 Rupees 1967 MauritiusMahébourg is a small city on the south-eastern coast of the island of Mauritius. It is considered the main village of the Grand Port District.

It is named after Bertrand-François Mahé de La Bourdonnais, one of the most successful governors of the French colonial period. It was originally built by the Netherlands during their brief period of colonization of the island. It was close to their landing port, had ample water supply from many rivers and streams and had a scenic view of the large bay area. Mahébourg knew major development around 1806 during the French colonization era.

The well-planned wide streets in the old section of Mahébourg still bear testimony to this Dutch and French colonial past. After the French chose Port Louis as the main port Mahébourg declined into a sleepy coastal city. The past is still preserved today in the Historical Naval Museum which also recounts the epic naval battles of the past between the French Navy and the Royal Navy. The Dutch historical museum in Grand Port recounts the early Dutch settlement of the island.

Nowadays, Mahébourg is a bustling center of local trade. The new waterfront complex promises some memorable walks along the sea-side. It even has a casino, mark of a developing tourism industry. There is a growing number of small inns in the city itself and the surrounding districts which cater for local and foreign visitors.

In spite of being well known for its lagoon (the biggest of Mauritius) and for its fishing industry, Mahébourg also has three primary schools namely, Willoughby Government School, Dupérré Government School and Notre Dame des Anges Roman Catholic Aided (RCA) and four secondary schools, namely Emmanuel Anquetil State Secondary School, Hamilton College Boys, Hamilton College Girls and Loretto Convent of Mahébourg.

5 Rupees 1967 MauritiusOn 30 December 1899, a monument was erected at the harbour of Grand Port in the memory of the British and French sailors who were killed in the Battle of Grand Port (1810).

The Battle of Grand Port was a naval battle between squadrons of frigates from the French Navy and the British Royal Navy. The battle was fought during 20-27 August 1810 over possession of the harbour of Grand Port on Isle de France (now Mauritius) during the Napoleonic Wars. The British squadron of four frigates sought to blockade the port to prevent its use by the French through the capture of the fortified Île de la Passe at its entrance. This position was seized by a British landing party on 13 August, and when a French squadron under Captain Guy-Victor Duperré approached the bay nine days later the British commander, Captain Samuel Pym, decided to lure them into coastal waters where his superior numbers could be brought to bear against the French ships.

Four of the five French ships managed to break past the British blockade, taking shelter in the protected anchorage, which was only accessible through a series of complicated reefs and sandbanks that were impassable without an experienced harbour pilot. When Pym ordered his frigates to attack the anchored French on August 22 and 23, his ships became trapped in the narrow channels of the bay: two were irretrievably grounded; a third, outnumbered by the combined French squadron, was defeated; and a fourth was unable to close to within effective gun range. Although the French ships were also badly damaged, the battle was a disaster for the British: one ship was captured after suffering irreparable damage, the grounded ships were set on fire to prevent their capture by French boarding parties and the remaining vessel was seized as it left the harbour by the main French squadron from Port Napoleon under Commodore Jacques Hamelin.

The British defeat was the worst the Royal Navy suffered during the entire war, and it left the Indian Ocean and its vital trade convoys exposed to attack from Hamelin's frigates. In response, the British authorities sought to reinforce the squadron on Île Bourbon under Josias Rowley by ordering all available ships to the region, but this piecemeal reinforcement resulted in a series of desperate actions as individual British ships were attacked by the more powerful and confident French squadron. In December 1810 an adequate reinforcement was collected, with the provision of a strong battle squadron under Admiral Albemarle Bertie, that rapidly invaded and subdued Isle de France.

The battle is noted as the most significant defeat for the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars. Not only had four frigates been lost with their entire crews, but 105 experienced sailors had been killed and 168 wounded in one of the bloodiest frigate encounters of the war. French losses were also heavy, with Duperré reporting 36 killed and 112 wounded on his squadron and among the soldiers firing from the shore.

The loss of such a large proportion of his force placed Rowley at a significant disadvantage in September 1810, as Hamelin's squadron, bolstered by the newly commissioned Iphigénie, now substantially outnumbered his own (the ruined Néréide was also attached to the French squadron, but the damage suffered was so severe that the ship never sailed again). Withdrawing to Isle de France, Rowley requested that reinforcements be diverted from other duties in the region to replace his lost ships and to break the French blockade of Île Bourbon, led by Bouvet. These newly arrived British frigates, cruising alone in unfamiliar waters, became targets for Hamelin, who twice forced the surrender of single frigates, only for Rowley to beat his ships away from their prize each time. On the second occasion, Rowley was able to chase and capture Hamelin and his flagship Vénus, bringing an end to his raiding career and to the activities of his squadron, who remained on Isle de France until they were all captured at the fall of the island in December 1810 by an invasion fleet under Vice-Admiral Albemarle Bertie.

A large grey stone column is attached to a larger, unclear structure. Inscribed on the column are "Diersheim", "Dusseldorf", "Grand Port" and "M.Jaroslawietz".

In France the action was greeted with celebration, and it became the only naval battle commemorated on the Arc de Triomphe. The British response was despondent, although all four captains were subsequently cleared and praised at their courts-martial inquiring into the loss of their ships. The only criticism was of Willoughby, who was accused of giving a misleading signal in indicating that the French were of inferior force on 22 August. Contemporary historian William James described British reaction to the battle as "that the noble behaviour of her officers and crew threw such a halo of glory around the defeat at Grand Port, that, in public opinion at least, the loss of four frigates was scarcely considered a misfortune." However, he also notes that "No case of which we are aware more deeply affects the character of the Royal Navy than the defeat it sustained at Grand Port."

5 Rupees 1967 MauritiusLion Mountain is a 1,575 ft. / 480 m. mountain peak near Bois des Amourettes, Grand Port, Mauritius. Based on peakery data, it ranks as the 33rd highest mountain in Mauritius. The nearest peaks are Piton Rouge, Mont Brise, Mont Camizard, Mont Bambou, Mont des Creoles, and Mont Villars. (peakery.com)

Denominations in Bhojpuri language are in the lower left and upper right corners. In the upper left and lower right corners - in Western numerals.

Comments:

200 rupees 2007200 rupees 2007

The image of the Dodo is present on some coins of Mauritius. I have one such coin. It is 200 Rupees 2007, dedicated to the 40th Anniversary of Bank of Mauritius

TDLR Portrait Bradbury Wilkinson Portrait De La Rue version of the portrait. In this version, the darker shading on the side of The Queen's face below her temple has a distinct edge, highlighting her cheekbone. In addition, the braid on her cloak is drawn more simply and regularly.

Bradbury Wilkinson version of the portrait. The distinguishing features of this portrait are the even shading on side of The Queen's face, below her temple, and the distinct highlights given to the braid on the front of Her cloak, which originates from the bow on Her left shoulder.

Interesting facts:

The Dodo is a fictional character appearing in Chapters 2 and 3 of the book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson).

The Dodo is a caricature of the author. A popular but unsubstantiated belief is that Dodgson chose the particular animal to represent himself because of his stammer, and thus would accidentally introduce himself as "Do-do-dodgson."

In this passage Lewis Carroll incorporated references to the original boating expedition of 4 July 1862 during which Alice's Adventures were first told, with Alice as herself, and the others represented by birds: the Lory was Lorina Liddell, the Eaglet was Edith Liddell, the Dodo was Dodgson, and the Duck was Rev.Robinson Duckworth. In order to get dry after a swim, the Dodo proposes that everyone run a Caucus race where the participants run in patterns of any shape, starting and leaving off whenever they like, so that everyone wins. At the end of the race, Alice distributes comfits from her pocket to all as prizes. However this leaves no prize for herself. The Dodo inquires what else she has in her pocket. As she has only a thimble, the Dodo requests it from her and then awards it to Alice as her prize. The Caucus Race as depicted by Carroll is a satire on the political caucus system, mocking its lack of clarity and decisiveness.