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10 Pounds Sterling 2007, Isle of Man

in Banknotes Book Number: IM54b
Years of issue: 2007
Edition:
Signatures: Chief Financial Officer: Mr. P.M. Shimmin
Serie: 2002 Issue
Specimen of: 1991
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 142 x 75
Printer: De la Rue currency,Gateshead

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

10 Pounds Sterling 2007

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Triskelion.

Avers:

10 Pounds Sterling 2007

HM The Queen Elizabeth II.

The portraits in this group are official portraits, taken by Anthony Buckley, circa 1966. The sitting that produced the photographs on which these engravings are based also produced a number of similar portraits that were used on postage stamps.

In this portrait The Queen is wearing Queen Victoria's Collet Necklace and Earrings. (While this necklace is depicted in Portrait 10, the matching earrings are not used for that portrait.)

Queen Victoria's Collet Necklace

The Coronation Necklace and Earrings are an important set in the Queen's collection not just because of overall diamond weight but, because of historical significance.

The necklace was created for Queen Victoria in 1858 and has been worn by queens for every coronation after Queen Victoria's death, hence the name. It currently has 26 stones: 25 in the necklace itself, plus the 22.48 carat Lahore Diamond as a pendant. "From her Majesty's Jewel vault"

drop earrings

The drops of the earrings are stones taken from the Timur Ruby Necklace, owned by The Queen.

Each old-cut diamond cluster surmount suspending a foliate diamond link and pear-shaped diamond cluster drop, mounted in silver and gold.

King George IV started a practice in the British royal family which continues today: the awarding of family orders. These are diamond-set portraits of the monarch suspended from a silk bow (the color varying by reign), and they are today given to female royal family members of the sovereign's choosing as a personal gift.

Royal Family Order George V

Queen Elizabeth was first given her grandfather George V's order, set on pale blue silk.

Royal Family Order George VI

Followed by her father George VI's, on pink silk, and she wears them both today. (A royal lady can wear all the family orders she has at once.) The orders are positioned on the left shoulder. They are worn for the most formal events, and can usually be seen on the Queen when she's at a tiara event.

In most renditions of this portrait, the Royal Family Order of King George VI is apparent below the left-hand shoulder of Her Majesty, while the uppermost portion of the Royal Family Order of King George V is apparent in only some renditions of the portrait. (Her majesty's Jewel Vault)

In this portrait, the Royal Family Order of King George V has been truncated.

Centered, is an emblem of Isle of Man - Triskelion.

Triskelion

A triskelion or triskele (which invariably has rotational symmetry) is a motif consisting of three interlocked spirals, three bent human legs, or three bent/curved lines extending from the center of the symbol. Both words are from Greek "τρισκέλιον" (triskelion) or "τρισκελής" (triskeles), "three-legged", from prefix "τρι-" (tri-), "three times" + "σκέλος" (skelos), "leg".

Although it appears in many places and periods including 3200 BCE Newgrange, it is especially characteristic of the Celtic art of the La Tène culture of the European Iron Age.

A triskelion is the symbol of Sicily, where it is called trinacria, as well as of the Isle of Man, Brittany, and the town of Füssen in Germany.

It is unknown how the Manx triskelion was originally adopted, and several theories have been put forward its origin. In 1607, English historian William Camden stated that it was derived from the Sicilian triskelion. In 1885 John Newton considered the Manx triskelion originated in the mid XIII century, when the Pope offered the throne of Sicily to Edmund, son of King Henry III of England. Newton noted that the wife of King Alexander III of Scotland was Henry's daughter, and that Alexander visited the English court in 1255. Later in 1266, Norway ceded the Isle of Man to the Kingdom of Scotland, and Newton considered it likely that Alexander utilized the triskelion for the arms of his new possession. It has also been suggested that the ancestry of the Manx triskelion can be traced to the triquetra in a coin of Olaf Cuaran, a X-century Norse-Gaelic warlord who was king of Northumbria and king of Dublin. Lending credibility to this theory is the current belief that the mediaeval Manx dynasty was related to that of Olaf Cuaran. However, the gap between the X century and late 13th century, when the Manx triskelion is first recorded, is wide indeed, and it has been noted that several kings from this period are known to have borne a galley as their emblem, and not a triskelion.

Early examples of the symbol are present in the Royal Arms ascribed to the King of Mann in several late XIII century armorials. The Manx triskelion also appears on the Manx Sword of State, which is popularly said to date to the time of King Olaf the Black (d. 1237), although recent analysis has shown it more likely dates to about the XV century. Another example can be seen on a XIV-century stone cross in the churchyard of Maughold. Another is example is a late XIV-century seal of Sir William le Scrope, Lord of Mann, in which the Manx triskelion is depicted in plate armour, rather than mail. Early representations of the Manx triskelion show the legs running clockwise, and later representations show the legs running in both directions.

The motto is "quocunque jeceris stabit", which is Latin and means: "whichever way you throw, it will stand". The motto dates to the XVII century, where it is first recorded as being present on Manx coinage dating to the year 1668. It is possible that the motto became associated to the Manx triskelion through these coins.

Denominations in numerals are in top left and lower right corners. In words centered.

Revers:

10 Pounds Sterling 2007

View from the promenade at Peel Castle. Engraving or painting made around 1830.

The original engraving I have not found, so here are the photos of the castle of the late XIX - early XX century, made approximately from the same point, on the waterfront.

Peel castle Peel castle Peel castle Peel castle

Peel Castle (Cashtal Purt-ny-Hinshey in Manx Gaelic) is a castle in Peel on the Isle of Man, originally constructed by Vikings. The castle stands on St Patrick's Isle which is connected to the town by a causeway. It is now owned by Manx National Heritage and is open to visitors during the summer.

The castle was built in the XI century by the Vikings, under the rule of King Magnus Barefoot. While there were older stone Celtic monastic buildings on the island, the first Viking fortifications were built of wood. The prominent round tower was originally part of the Celtic monastery, but has had battlements added at a later date. In the early XIV century, the majority of the walls and towers were built primarily from local red sandstone, which is found abundantly in the area. After the rule of the Vikings, the castle continued to be used by the Church due to the cathedral built there – the see of the diocese of Sodor and Man – but was eventually abandoned in the XVIII century.

The castle remained fortified, and new defensive positions were added as late as 1860. The buildings within the castle are now mostly ruined, but the outer walls remain intact. Excavations in 1982-1987 revealed an extensive graveyard as well as the remains of Magnus Barefoot's original wooden fort. The most spectacular finds were the 10th century grave of "The Pagan Lady" which included a fine example of a Viking necklace and a cache of silver coins dating from about 1030. The Castle's most famous "resident" is the so-called Moddey Dhoo or "Black Dog" ghost.

Peel Castle may occasionally be confused with Piel Castle, located on Piel Island, around 30 miles to the east in the Irish Sea. This particularly occurs in reference to the William Wordsworth poem describing Piel, spelling its name as "Peele": especially as Wordsworth is documented as having visited Peel Castle, and wrote several times about the Isle of Man.

Peel Castle has been proposed as a possible location of the Arthurian Avalon.

The cathedral ruins located within the walls of Peel Castle are those of the former Cathedral of St. German. Like the structures throughout the castle grounds, the cathedral's roof is completely missing. An examination by Robert Anderson to determine what repairs were required to restore the cathedral was completed and reported to the island's lieutenant governor in 1877. However, none of the suggested repairs were carried out.

A pointed barrel-vaulted crypt exists below the chancel measuring 34 feet by 16 feet by 9 feet high at the west end, sloping to the entrance at the east.

In the middle of the transept is the tomb where Bishop Rutter was interred in 1661.

A cemetery exists in what was once the cathedral's nave.

In 1980 the parish of German, part of the Church of England's Diocese of Sodor and Man, was officially transferred to the newer Cathedral Church of St German on Albany Road in Peel.

Along the borders of banknote is interlaced Celtic design with Celtic crosses inside.

Manx Wheel cross

The Celtic crosses.

This cross design has the circle in the center symbolizing God, the motionless mover. Although the wheel cross as a whole was originally a symbol of Christ derived from the Chi-rho monogram, it came to symbolize heaven. The interlaced knot-work, so prominent on Celtic crosses represented the beginning and the end of the eternal circle.

Manx Wheel cross

Celtic cross represents a unique blend of Christianity and the ancient Indo-European tradition. Cross in a circle is the ancient symbol of life and of the world order, occurring everywhere from India to Norway, however, it became the emblem of the Celtic world - Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Isle of Man. Christianity brought by the monks missionaries to Ireland back in the IV century, has absorbed all the richness and beauty of the ancient Celtic culture: the myths and legends, the elements of art, the secret knowledge of the Druids. Celtic cross is a symbol of wisdom and harmony, the link between the past and the present, the emblem of Celtic culture and the entire northern European tradition.

Denominations in numerals are in lower corners. In words at the top.

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