header Notes Collection
Top

1 Kwacha 1968, Zambia

in Krause book Number: 5a
Years of issue: 1968
Edition: 12 444 838
Signatures: Governor: Dr. J.B. Zulu (in office 1967 - 1970)
Serie: 1968 Issue
Specimen of: 1968
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 130 x 70
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

1 Kwacha 1968

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Kenneth David Kaunda.

Avers:

1 Kwacha 1968

Kenneth David Kaunda

The engraving on banknote is made after the photo of Kenneth David Kaunda, made, approximately, between 1968 and 1970.

Kenneth David Kaunda (born 28 April 1924), also known as KK, served as the first President of Zambia, from 1964 to 1991. Kaunda is the youngest of eight children born to an ordained Church of Scotland missionary and teacher. He followed his father's steps in becoming a teacher. He was at the forefront of the struggle for independence from European rule. Dissatisfied with Nkumbula's leadership of the African National Congress, he broke away and founded the Zambian African National Congress, later becoming the head of the United National Independence Party. He was the first President of the independent Zambia.

The Coat of arms of Zambia is on top.

coat Zambia

The coat of arms of Zambia was adopted on 24 October 1964 when the Republic of Zambia reached its independence. This coat of arms is adapted from the arms of the Colony of Northern Rhodesia which dates to 1927.

The eagle of liberty African Fish Eagle represents the conquest of freedom and nation's hope for the future.

The pick and hoe represent the country's economic backbone: agriculture and mining, as well as the characteristics that have influenced Zambia's evolution and nature. The shield is a representation of Victoria Falls with white water cascading over black rock. The Victoria Falls represents the Zambezi river, from which Zambia takes its name. The coat of arms also has emblems of Zambia's natural resources: minerals and mining, agriculture and wildlife.

The shield is supported by two figures which represent the common man and woman of the nation. The country's motto is "One Zambia, One Nation", which emphasizes the need for unity in a country of over 60 ethnic groups.

At the bottom are stylized national pattern as Rhombus.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words centered.

Revers:

1 Kwacha 1968

Now exactly about reverse:

Kenneth David Kaunda

On left side is Nicotiana tabacum.

Nicotiana tabacum, or cultivated tobacco, is an annually-grown herbaceous plant. It is found only in cultivation, where it is the most commonly grown of all plants in the Nicotiana genus, and its leaves are commercially grown in many countries to be processed into tobacco. It grows to heights between 1 and 2 meters. Research is ongoing into its ancestry among wild Nicotiana species, but it is believed to be a hybrid of Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tomentosiformis, and possibly Nicotiana otophora.

Ferguson Ferguson

Right of tobacco is tractor on field. I tried to determine its model, and that is what I think:

On banknote is tractor "Massey Ferguson 65", which was produced from 1958 to 1964. The factories were in Coventry, Great Britain and Detroit, USA. Its price, for 1964, was 3935 US dollars. (www.tractordata.com)

Sanga Sanga

Centered are 2 peasants plowing with help of Abyssinian oxes or Sanga oxes. It is an Ethiopian breed of oxes, standing out with its long horns and a hump on its back.

Gossypium herbaceum

Lower, under the oxes, is a branch of Levant cotton.

Gossypium herbaceum, commonly known as Levant cotton, is a species of cotton native to the semi-arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa and Arabia where it still grows in the wild as a perennial shrub.

G. herbaceum has high stems that grow 2 feet (0.61 m.) to 6 feet (1.8 m.) high with wide, hairy leaves. Their flowers are small and yellow with a purple center. When ripe and in warm weather, the flower capsule will burst and expose the cotton surrounding the seeds firmly. The cotton produced by this plant is short, about 2 inches (5.1 cm.) long and is firmly attached to the seed, which is covered in hairy down. An acre of cotton can be expected to produce about 300 pounds (140 kg.).

Zéa máys

On right side is Maize (Zéa máys).

Maize (Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a large grain plant first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears, which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds.

Maize has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup. The six major types of corn are dent corn, flint corn, pod corn, popcorn, flour corn, and sweet corn.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words lower, centered.

Comments: