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10 Kwacha 1968, Zambia

in Krause book Number: 7a
Years of issue: 1968
Edition: 6 141 053
Signatures: Governor: Dr. J.B. Zulu (in office 1967 - 1970)
Serie: 1968 Issue
Specimen of: 1968
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 152 x 79
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

10 Kwacha 1968

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Kenneth David Kaunda.

Avers:

10 Kwacha 1968

Kenneth David KaundaThe engraving on banknote is made after the photo of Kenneth David Kaunda, made, approximately, between 1968 and 1970.

Kenneth David Kaunda (born 28 April 1924), also known as KK, served as the first President of Zambia, from 1964 to 1991. Kaunda is the youngest of eight children born to an ordained Church of Scotland missionary and teacher. He followed his father's steps in becoming a teacher. He was at the forefront of the struggle for independence from European rule. Dissatisfied with Nkumbula's leadership of the African National Congress, he broke away and founded the Zambian African National Congress, later becoming the head of the United National Independence Party. He was the first President of the independent Zambia.

The Coat of arms of Zambia is on top.

coat Zambia

The coat of arms of Zambia was adopted on 24 October 1964 when the Republic of Zambia reached its independence. This coat of arms is adapted from the arms of the Colony of Northern Rhodesia which dates to 1927.

The eagle of liberty African Fish Eagle represents the conquest of freedom and nation's hope for the future.

The pick and hoe represent the country's economic backbone: agriculture and mining, as well as the characteristics that have influenced Zambia's evolution and nature. The shield is a representation of Victoria Falls with white water cascading over black rock. The Victoria Falls represents the Zambezi river, from which Zambia takes its name. The coat of arms also has emblems of Zambia's natural resources: minerals and mining, agriculture and wildlife.

The shield is supported by two figures which represent the common man and woman of the nation. The country's motto is "One Zambia, One Nation", which emphasizes the need for unity in a country of over 60 ethnic groups.

Haliaeetus vocifer

The African Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer) or the African Sea Eagle is a large species of eagle that is found throughout sub-Saharan Africa wherever large bodies of open water occur that have an abundant food supply. It is the national bird of Zimbabwe, Zambia and South Sudan.

Below, in the center, is a circular pattern, which have not been able to identify. It looks like a shield, but I am still looking for confirmation.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words centered.

Revers:

10 Kwacha 1968

Victoria fallsVictoria Falls - the view from Zambia.

Victoria Falls, or Mosi-oa-Tunya (Tokaleya Tonga: the Smoke that Thunders), is a waterfall in southern Africa on the Zambezi River at the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe (Rhodesia).

David Livingstone, the Scottish missionary and explorer, is believed to have been the first European to view Victoria Falls on 16 November 1855 from what is now known as Livingstone Island, one of two land masses in the middle of the river, immediately upstream from the falls on the Zambian side. Livingstone named his discovery in honour of Queen Victoria, but the indigenous name "Mosi-oa-Tunya" - "the smoke that thunders" - continues in common usage as well. The nearby national park in Zambia, for example, is named "Mosi-oa-Tunya", whereas the national park and town on the Zimbabwean shore are both named Victoria Falls. The World Heritage List officially recognizes both names.

Victoria - the only waterfall in the world, having more than 100 meters high and more than a kilometer wide.

Denominations in numerals are in all corners. In words lower, centered.

Comments:

Dot in denomination values - 1968 Issue.