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50 Dollars 2010, Cayman Islands

in Krause book Number: 42a
Years of issue: 04.04.2011
Edition:
Signatures: Minister of finance: Mr. McKeeva Bush, Managing director: Mrs. Cindy Scotland
Serie: Serie D (2010)
Specimen of: 2010
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 156 х 66
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), London

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

50 Dollars 2010

Description

Watermark:

watermark

The green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas), also known as the green turtle, black (sea) turtle, or Pacific green turtle, is a large sea turtle of the family Cheloniidae. It is the only species in the genus Chelonia. Its range extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The common name comes from the usually green fat found beneath its carapace.

An abbreviation "CIMA" (Cayman islands Monetary Authority).

watermark

The cornerstones are in all corners.

Avers:

50 Dollars 2010

HM The Queen Elizabeth II HM The Queen Elizabeth II.

This portrait of Her Majesty is adapted from a photograph, taken in Sandringham House by Mark Lawrence in 1999. (Peter Symes)

Her Majesty is shown wearing The Grand Duchess Vladimir of Russia's Tiara.

Tiara

The Grand Duchess Vladimir Tiara.

No tiara is complete without a fascinating backstory, and this one's even got a daring escape. Made by Bolin, it glittered at the Russian royal court on the head of Grand Duchess Vladimir until the revolution, when it was left behind as the family fled. A British agent and friend smuggled it out of Russia to rejoin the exiled Grand Duchess and her collection. After her death, the tiara was bought from her daughter by Queen Mary. It's worn often today by the Queen with pearl or emerald drops, or occasionally with no drops. The pearl drop option has been the most popular with the Queen in recent years, probably owing to her love of white gowns in the evening and accompanying white jewels.

This tiara was inherited by the Grand Duchess's daughter, the Grand Duchess Helen who subsequently married Prince Nicholas of Greece. Queen Mary bought the tiara from Princess Nicholas in 1921. The tiara has fifteen pearl drops but Princess Mary had fifteen emeralds mounted in such a way that they are interchangeable with the pearls. In this illustration, Her Majesty is wearing the tiara with the pearl drops.

Also on Her Majesty is The Diamond Chandelier Drop Demi-Parure.

Chandelier necklace

A matched set of a necklace and a pair of earrings, this demi-parure is made of diamonds in multiple intricate pendants, each tipped with a pear-shaped diamond drop. Its provenance has not been officially confirmed, but it certainly has the look of a gift from one of the Middle Eastern rulers, and the Queen did wear it during a 1987 state visit from King Fahd of Saudi Arabia. (I am using a name that refers to its complicated pendant structure, since the gift is not confirmed).

The Queen has used this set fairly often, even for some official portraits. It is a slightly more grand option than pieces such as the King Khalid Diamond Necklace (very similar, and a confirmed Saudi gift), the Diamond Pear-Shaped Pendant Fringe Necklace, or the King Faisal Diamond Necklace (another confirmed Saudi gift). "From her Majesty's Jewel vault".

The Coat of arms of Cayman islands is centered.

coat Cayman islands

The Cayman Islands’ coat of arms consists of a shield, a crested helm and the motto. Three green stars, representing each of the three inhabited Islands (Grand Cayman, Little Cayman and Cayman Brac), are set in the lower two-thirds of the shield. The stars rest on blue and white wavy bands representing the sea. In the top third of the shield, against a red background, is a gold lion passant guardant (walking with the further forepaw raised and the body seen from the side), representing Britain. Above the shield is a green turtle on a coil of rope. Behind the turtle is a gold pineapple.

The turtle represents the Caymans seafaring history,

the rope, its traditional thatch-rope industry,

and the pineapple, its ties with Jamaica.

The islands’ motto, “He hath founded it upon the seas”, is printed at the bottom of the shield. This line, a verse from Psalm 24 Verse 2, acknowledges the Caymans’ Christian heritage, as well as its ties to the sea.

The proposal for a coat of arms was approved by the Legislative Assembly in 1957, and public input was sought on its design. The Royal Warrant assigning “Armorial Ensigns for the Cayman Islands” was approved by Her Majesty’s command on 14 May 1958.

Also, centered, the map of Cayman Islands.

DasyatidaeAcross all field of banknote are The southern stingrays.

More about these stingrays please read at reverse description.

Denominations in numerals are in lower left and top right corners. Centered, lower, in words.

Revers:

50 Dollars 2010

In top left corner is a sea shell.

DasyatidaeCentered is the southern stingray (Dasyatis americana) in moving.

One of the most popular places on the island Grand Cayman - the Stingray City, named after the stingrays. This is due to the fact, that in the shallows, which are close to the city, is the home to a large number of southern stingrays. In many parts of the Caribbean such as Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands and Antigua, the southern stingray swims with divers and snorkelers, and are hand fed on a locations such as Stingray City and the Sandbar.

The southern stingray (Dasyatis americana), is a stingray of the family Dasyatidae (the Whiptail Stingrays) found in tropical and subtropical waters of the Western Atlantic Ocean from New Jersey to southern Brazil.

It has a flat, diamond-shaped disc, with a mud brown, olive, and grey dorsal surface and white underbelly (ventral surface). The barb on its tail is serrated and covered in a venomous mucous, used for self-defense.

The southern stingray is adapted for life on the sea bed. The flattened, diamond-shaped body has sharp corners, making it more angular than the discs of other rays. The top of the body varies between olive brown and green in adults, dark grey in juveniles, whilst the underside is predominantly white. The wing-like pectoral fins are used to propel the stingray across the ocean bottom, whilst the slender tail possesses a long, serrated and poisonous spine at the base, used for defense. These spines are not fatal to humans, but are incredibly painful if stepped on. The eyes are situated on top of the head of the southern stingray, along with small openings called spiracles. The location of the spiracles enables the stingray to take in water whilst lying on the seabed, or when partially buried in sediment. Water enters the spiracles and leaves through the gill openings, bypassing the mouth which is on the underside. Female stingrays can grow to a disc width of 150 cm., contrary to the smaller male stingrays that reach maximum size at 67 cm.

Denominations in numerals are in lower left and top right corners. In lower right corner in words.

Comments:

The signatures on banknote are:

William McKeeva BushWilliam McKeeva Bush.

William McKeeva Bush, JP OBE (born 20 January 1955) is a Caymanian politician and the former Premier of the Cayman Islands, as well as Minister of Finance. Bush, the leader of the United Democratic Party, is the first elected member for the district of West Bay, and has served seven consecutive terms in the Legislative Assembly of the Cayman Islands representing that constituency. He was removed from his post as Premier in a vote of no confidence following his arrest in December 2012 and was succeeded by Julianna O'Connor-Connolly. Mr. Bush has since been found Not-Guilty of corruption by the Grand Court of the Cayman Islands in 2014 and was acquitted of all charges made against him. He is the country's longest ever serving political figure with service spanning over 30 years.

Mrs. Cindy ScotlandMrs. Cindy Scotland.

Cindy Scotland has served as the Managing Director of the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority since June 2002. In this role she oversees the implementation of policies to ensure the sound management of the Cayman Islands’ currency and the effective supervision of the more than 14,000 regulated entities operating in and from the Cayman Islands. She also has responsibility for the development and maintenance of strong working relationships between CIMA and other international regulatory bodies.

The Cayman Islands dollar has been pegged to the United States dollar at 1 Cayman Islands dollar = 1.2 U.S. dollars since 1 April 1974.