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5 Shillings 1961, East Africa

in Krause book Number: 41a
Years of issue: 1961
Edition:
Signatures: Mr. Edgeworth Beresford David, Mr. John Henry Butler, Mr. Colin de Neufville Hill, Mr. Craig Reid Cantlie Donald, Mr. Thomas Oates, Mr. Geoffrey Charles Lawrence, Mr. John Barraclough de Loynes
Serie: 1961 - 1963 Issue
Specimen of: 1958
Material: Cotton fiber
Size (mm): 133 х 70
Printer: TDLR (Thomas de la Rue & Company), Nairobi

* All pictures marked magnify are increased partially by magnifying glass, the remaining open in full size by clicking on the image.

** The word "Specimen" is present only on some of electronic pictures, in accordance with banknote images publication rules of appropriate banks.

5 Shillings 1961

Description

Watermark:

watermark

Head of the lion (from the Emblem of East Africa)

Avers:

5 Shillings 1961

Photo by Dorothy Wilding, 26 February 1952, HM The Queen Elizabeth II

HM The Queen Elizabeth II.

The first official photographic sitting with the new Queen was granted to the society photographer Dorothy Wilding. It took place on 26 February 1952, just twenty days after the accession. A total of fifty-nine photographs were taken by Wilding, showing The Queen dressed in a variety of gowns designed by Norman Hartnell and wearing jewellery including the Diamond Diadem. The photographs taken during this sitting were the basis of The Queen’s image on postage stamps from 1953 until 1971, as well as providing the official portrait of The Queen which was sent to every British embassy throughout the world. (Royal collection trust)

Diadem

The Queen is wearing the George IV State Diadem. Made by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell (and likely designed by their designer, Philip Liebart) in 1820, the diadem features a set of 4 crosses pattée alternating with 4 bouquets of roses, thistles, and shamrocks. The motifs are set on a band of diamond scrollwork between two bands of pearls. Queen Alexandra had the diadem made smaller in 1902, reducing the top band of pearls from 86 to 81, and the bottom band from 94 to 88. The front cross is set with a 4 carat yellow diamond, and the piece features 1,333 diamonds in all. (Sartorial Splendor)

Necklace present from Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar

The necklace worn by The Queen, of diamond flowers and leaves, was a wedding present from Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar. The necklace was originally crafted in 1930s by Cartier. It was a wedding gift to Queen Elizabeth II, who was still a princess, on her wedding to Prince Philip from the Last Nizam of Hyderabad, Mir Osman Ali Khan in 1947. The Nizam of Hyderabad asked the Queen to choose two pieces from Cartier to mark her wedding, and she chose a tiara and a matching necklace based on an English rose.

The necklace was made by Cartier with 38 diamonds, with a diamond-encrusted snap. It has a detachable double-drop pendant, made of 13 emerald-cut diamonds and a pear-shaped drop, forms the pave-set center of the necklace. The design was based on English roses.

Pair of pearl drop earrings, circa 1947

Pair of pearl drop earrings, made circa 1947.

The pearls used to create these earrings were a wedding present to Princess Elizabeth in 1947 from the Sheikh of Bahrain. The diamonds used in the earrings use a variety of modern cuts. (A Royal Wedding 1947)

In these portraits she is woman first and Queen second. However, the beauty of Her Majesty in these images has been enhanced by the engraver. The original portrait, while very flattering, represents Her Majesty in a more regal aspect and with, perhaps, less distinct facial features. (Peter Symes)

Denominations are in all corners in numerals. In Top left corner in Arabic language (Indian state Hyderabad), in bottom right corner in Gujarati language.

In the middle in words.

Revers:

5 Shillings 1961

cottonOn the top is Levant cotton.

Gossypium herbaceum, commonly known as Levant cotton, is a species of cotton native to the semi-arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa and Arabia where it still grows in the wild as a perennial shrub. It is a sister-species of Gossypium arboreum.

It was first cultivated in Western Sudan, from there it spread to India, before being introduced to Egypt. It reached China around 700 AD and was first cultivated from this period. It can also be found in Pakistan and almost all of the former Soviet Union areas.

A legend was perpetuated from a factual description of this plant by Greek historian Herodotus in the V century BC. Although his book, simply titled Histories, was an account of a war between the Persian Empire and the Greek city-states. It also contained descriptions of vast lands beyond the boundaries of the world known by the Greeks at that time. He wrote: "certain trees...bear forth their fruit fleeces surpassing those of sheep in beauty and excellence, and the natives clothe themselves in cloths made therefrom." From this description came the legend of the "vegetable lamb plant" which was said to be a real sheep. The tree would grow from a melon-like seed and grow into a lamb rooted to the earth by a stem from its navel. It was said to graze on the surrounding vegetation until the all greenery around it was devoured at which point it would wither and die. A XIV century traveler by the name of Sir John Mandeville, professed to eating the flesh of this herbal beast. Although scientists tried to debunk this tale it was not officially labeled as a fable until 1887.

Syzygium aromaticum

On the right and left sides are Cloves.

Cloves are the aromatic flower buds of a tree in the family Myrtaceae, Syzygium aromaticum. They are native to the Maluku Islands in Indonesia, and are commonly used as a spice. Cloves are commercially harvested primarily in Indonesia, India, Madagascar, Zanzibar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Tanzania.

The clove tree is an evergreen tree that grows up to 8-12 m. tall, with large leaves and sanguine flowers grouped in terminal clusters. The flower buds initially have a pale hue, gradually turn green, then transition to a bright red when ready for harvest. Cloves are harvested at 1.5-2.0 cm. long, and consist of a long calyx that terminates in four spreading sepals, and four unopened petals that form a small central ball.

Denominations are in all corners in numerals. In the middle in words.

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